Top 5 Best Tires For Toyota Tundra [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

You didn’t buy a Toyota Tundra to drive it on the highway, did you? I didn’t think so.

You need the best tires for Toyota Tundra to perform up to its max potential. I’m not a huge fan of the Tundra like I am the Tacoma, but I do know that these things are beastly off-road.

I’ve mounted up (and test-driven) plenty of tires for the Tundra. Here are the best tires for Toyota Tundra according to my professional opinion:

Our Top Pick
Toyo Open Country R/T
Toyo Open Country
4.5/5
4.5
Best Budget
Falken WILDPEAK A/T TRAIL All-Terrain Radial Tire
Falken Wildpeak
4.0/5
4.0
Best High End
Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Yokohama Geolandar HT G056
Yokohama Geolandar
4.5/5
4.5
Longest Tread Life
General Grabber ATX
General Grabbers
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Toyo Open Country

Toyo Open Country R/T
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

Toyo Open Country tires are hands down the best Toyota Tundra tires to improve driving performance, cosmetic appearance, and everything in between like treadwear and durability.

The main reason I choose Toyo Open Country over any other brand is that they’ve come through for me when I truly needed them. Long and remote mountain roads become less stressful with a nice set of tires like these, and sandy beaches become less intimidating.

Pick the best submodel of Toyo Open Country, and let them show you what your Tundra is capable of at the top of its game. Here are a few of your choices:

These have a completely unique tread pattern that not only makes sense for a Tundra but is also extremely attractive. Choose these if you want aggressive off-road traction while maintaining quiet road performance.

Go with the all-season option of the Open Country if you mostly drive on the highway but still need rigid offroad durability. See also the Open Country A/T III.

Do you take your Tundra down seemingly unpassable dirt roads? These mud-terrain Toyos will keep you from getting stranded with a flat or stuck in a rut.

Choose these Toyo all-terrains for speedy offroading and more balanced road traction.

Toyo Open Country tires come with a pro-rated warranty according to tire mileage. Check the warranty for the specific model before buying to be aware of all the technicalities. These are the right tire for your Tundra, no doubt. You know what to do!

Falken Wildpeak

Falken WILDPEAK A/T TRAIL All-Terrain Radial Tire
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Many Toyota owners go with Falken Wildpeak tires because they’re reasonably and consistently priced from size to size, they’re smooth on the highway, rally on the dirt, and they’re built to last.

3D Canyon Sipes is the trademarked design for the Falken Wildpeaks—that helps them resist hydroplaning better than other Tundra tires.

I recommend these tires for you Tundra owners who have overland campers because they’re lighter weight than a full-on mudding tire, and I’ve noticed that they’re typically a bit smoother (and safer) at higher speeds despite the extra noise of the beefier treads.

One disaster that I’ve commonly seen with Falkens is their owner’s inability to keep them properly inflated and rotated— don’t buy these if you’re going to abandon them after the initial mount and balance. But for around 200 bucks a pop, these are a solid option for your Tundra, and I would put about as much trust in these as any other set I’ve recommended in this review under reasonable driving circumstances.

5 years/55-thousand miles isn’t bad as far as treadwear guarantee considering most people who buy these tires are out there pushing them to their limits. After six months of driving on these, I think you’ll find that you’re satisfied with their price and quality—I’ve serviced plenty of trucks multiple times with the same set of Falken Wildpeaks.

See our extensive Falken Wildpeak tire review to learn more. If you want literally the cheapest option, check out Starfire Solarus. I would only recommend them for ancient Tundras.

Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac

Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Goodyear Wrangler treads are just ruthless on the trails. I would not want to be the rattlesnake who got tatted by the Tundra coming through with Wranglers mounted up. Would I put these on my Tundra? Dude, I would never drive a Tundra (maybe a Taco). But yeah, I’d put them on my truck for sure.

Goodyear Wranglers have shoulders built like Tedy Bruschi, and they’ll be ready to pummel offroad terrain like an NFL linebacker once you change out from your stock Tundra tires. These like many other all-terrain tires have optional metal studs that will help you dominate icy roads and extreme weather conditions. If you don’t use metal studs, just install snow chains/snow socks and drive slower.

These also have an ‘R’ speed rating safe for speeds up to 106 MPH, so these are perfect for hauling your heavy trailer on the highway or into the mountains with even more rolling resistance and control than the Tundra already provides.

Goodyear Wranglers have that classic paw print tread design that basically everyone is familiar with seeing, and they also incorporate circumferential grooves for better hydroplaning performance. One thing you’ll notice is that these tires are very floaty, which is great offroad, but that also means you’ll need to grip the wheel with both hands when driving on the highway.

Spend a bit extra for good Tundra tires, and it’ll pay off in the long run. See also Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure.

Yokohama Geolandar

Yokohama Geolandar HT G056
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

I love the feel of brand-new Yokohama tires. The rubber compound is a perfect mix of firm and soft, they’re extremely easy to mount, and the tire bead never seems to give me any problems. The Yokohama tires I’ve run on my cars in the past always wear nice and consistent, and they never seem to have color-fading or performance changes in hot/cold weather conditions.

Choose from these all-terrain, mud-terrain, and highway-terrain (all-season) options of the Yokohama Geolandar for your Tundra:

Don’t get stuck in the sand with those stock all-season tires. Geolandar all-terrains have a refreshing mix of independent tread blocks mixed with continuous center rib tread grooves that make it one of the most versatile tires you can buy for the Tundra.

Check out the treads on these mud-terrain Geolandars! Comparing them to the classic Goodyear and BFG mud designs, you can tell that Yokohama has made some attractive improvements to help your Tundra shine in the mud and sand.

Geolandar H/T are built more for highway driving, but Yokohama puts some extra ‘umf’ into these tires to help for offroading performance when necessary. Buy these if you want to tow on fast highways.

Check individual submodels for speed/load ratings and treadwear warranties.

General Grabbers

General Grabber ATX
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

General Grabbers are a super affordable and excellent offroading tire made by Continental.

Honestly, these are sometimes the cheapest tires for the Tundra depending on the tire size, but they’re also some of the best. I will put either these or Toyos on my truck when it’s time for a new set.

These General Grabbers have a ‘Q’ speed rating letting you reach speeds of up to 99 MPH in your Tundra. The slightly higher speed rating will make them ride slightly firmer on dirt roads compared to say, BFGoodrich T/A KO2 (they have a super slow speed rating).

The difference between these and an ultra-cheap all-season tire option for your Tundra is that they resist puncture, cuts, and chipping substantially better. The sidewalls aren’t going to collapse if you run up against a sharp rock or curb, and their beefy treads are deliberately designed to eliminate ride noise (something you don’t always see with all-terrain tires).

General Grabbers are awesome at evenly distributing the tire pressure, and you can even install optional metal studs for those icy snow conditions. Oh, and I forgot to mention these come with a solid 6-year/60 thousand mile tread wear.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Toyota Tundra?

Don’t forget to factor these points into consideration when going ahead with the purchase of your new tires:

Type of tire

Don’t forget that each of these brands recommended above has different submodels designed to maximize either highway or mud/dirt performance depending on what suits your driving habits.

Fuel economy

Let’s face it, the 20 MPH (at best) gas mileage of your Toyota Tundra isn’t nice on your wallet. Come on, the newer American diesel engines are pushing 30 MPG already. Get your full-size truck game together, Toyota USA.

Load-rating/Ply

A common and sometimes dangerous mistake that Tundra owners make is installing tires with a lower than necessary load rating. Don’t put light truck tires on your Tundra!

Rebates

Sometimes the best set of Tundra tires is conditional. Always check for deals and rebate options.

Rims included

Buying Tundra tires already mounted and balanced with a proper set of wheels is a plus because you can quickly change them out in the garage once they arrive. Don’t forget to torque the lugs!

How Much Do Tires For Toyota Tundra Cost?

Don’t spend under two hundred dollars a tire unless you plan on blowing out hard. Here’s a quick ballpark estimate for what you should be spending on Toyota Tundra tires:

Four New Tires

Expect to pay at least $800 for the lowest-end Tundra tires plus mount and balance. There are cases where you might be able to shave some of the price lower, but I’m not ever going to recommend bunk tires for your full-sized pickup truck because towing is a serious business.

$1200 + mount and balance is about what you’ll pay for a nice set of full-sized truck tires for your Tundra.

Two New Tires

I’ll confidently tell you that if you pay $400 for two new tires, then that’s a steal. $600+ is a more realistic price range for two decent/higher-end Tundra tires.

Single Tire

Again, I wouldn’t spend below two hundy for a single Tundra tire. And FYI, you’re gonna need two tires if one blows out. This is a four-wheel drive vehicle, don’t mess up the drivetrain by running a lopsided tire setup.

Metal Stud Options

Some offroading tires sell metal studs that can be optionally installed after the fact for a quick transformation into snow tires.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Toyota Tundra?

Match the stock size for your specific Tundra submodel and year (i.e., TRD Pro, SR5, Limited, Platinum, etc.). Just plug in your Tundra’s info on Tire Rack’s website for the best results.

Tundras started in the early 2000s with 16-inch wheels, but you’ll notice that 2022 Tundras can have anywhere from 18 to 20-inch stock wheel setups.

How Long Should Your Toyota Tundra Tires Last?

Check the treadwear guarantee on the specific tires before buying.

Truck tires unfortunately don’t last quite as long as car tires because the suspension sits higher and there is more play in tread contact. That said, if you buy and properly maintain quality tires for your Tundra, they’ll last you 50+ thousand miles for sure.

I recommend filling Tundra tires with nitrogen to prolong longevity.

When To Replace Tires On Your Toyota Tundra?

The rule of thumb is to replace tires when the tread depths get down to 2/32” (1.6 mm), but I’m from the wild west, so I say replace them when you damn well please.

If you don’t care about offroading performance and aren’t towing anything, just make sure that the tire threads don’t show through—that’s when a dangerous blowout can happen. Oh, and believe me, blowing out full-sized truck tires is not like blowing out a tire on your Camry. The loss of control is quite a bit more drastic when it’s a Tundra.

Does The Brand Matter For A Toyota Tundra When Replacing Tires?

Yes! I’m a big fan of pairing Japanese vehicles with Japanese-made tires. Any of the brands listed above are your best bet. Chinese or other off-brand tires for a full-sized pickup truck? Yeah, don’t even think about it.

Other tire brands to consider for your Tundra include Nitto Grappler, Firestone Destination, Bridgestone Dueler, Michelin LTX M/S2, Cooper Discoverer, etc.

Does the Year of Your Toyota Tundra Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes, the Tundra has changed drastically since its first model year in 1999. Don’t let your Tundra tires age past 6 years without replacing them.

Also, don’t spend a bunch of money on a Tundra that’s pushing 250+ thousand miles on the odometer unless you plan on performing an engine swap. Toyota’s aluminum engine blocks are great, but they’re not good for more than 300 thousand miles.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Toyota Tundra?

You can pack some pretty big rubbers onto a Tundra if you add a suspension lift. For example, if you put a 3-inch Bilstein lift on your Tundra, you could likely get 22-inch rims on there just fine.

Frequently Asked Questions
Oh ya, the Tundra is one of the best trucks for anything offroad. Their versatile performance shines a refreshing light on their poor fuel economy.
Depends on the year and submodel of the Tundra. Plug your Tundra’s info into Tire Rack’s website for a complete list of compatible tire sizes.
See our budget option above. I wouldn’t go overboard on tires for an old Tundra because it’s gonna break down soon!!

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