Top 5 Best Tires For Toyota Tacoma [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

Shopping truck tires for your TacoZilla? The Toyota Tacoma is one of the most versatile and capable pickup trucks you could purchase, but I’m sure you already know that.

It might not have a powerful engine, but the places you can get to in a Toyota Tacoma top the list. From the beach to the highest mountains around, I’ve sent it with the Toyota Tacoma, and I know which tires you need for your specific driving.

Which are the best tires for Toyota Tacoma pickup trucks? Scroll down to find out my professional and tested opinion:

Our Top Pick
Toyo Open Country R/T
Toyo Open Country
4.5/5
4.5
Best Budget
Starfire Solarus HT All-Season
Starfire Solarus HT All-Season
3.5/5
3.5
Best High End
Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Yokohama Geolandar HT G056
Yokohama Geolandar
4.5/5
4.5
Best Tread Life
Michelin Defender LTX
Michelin Defender LTX M/S
4.5/5
4.5

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Toyo Open Country

Toyo Open Country R/T
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

Do you want badass and reliable tires for your Tacoma? I’ve driven these tires up and down some of the gnarliest roads in the Western USA with these Toyo Open country tires. These are the best Toyota Tacoma tires you’re gonna find.

There are a few different submodels of the open country, including:

The R/Ts are creme de la creme because they allow for efficient driving while casually destroying any offroad terrain that it leaves in its path. These are what I would put on my Tacoma because I drive in a healthy mix of road conditions. They won’t wobble at high speeds (when balanced correctly), and they also won’t let you down when you get stuck in the sand.

Toyo Open Country A31 tires are more for the highway, but they’ll still resist punctures and provide traction for those times when you want to turn down that more rugged fork in the road.

The M/Ts have a unique tread design intended for taking high road speeds and dirt cakes equally as efficiently. The Taj Mahal of tires for your Taco. Say goodbye to burning out the clutch when stuck in sandy or muddy terrain with these.

So choose which tread design is your fave, and let ‘er rip. You can’t go wrong with these.

Everything about these tires is unique, from the sidewalls to the tread pattern, and attention to detail is a key ingredient in making them my favorite. That, and I’ve successfully arrived back from camping alive thanks to the incredible performance of the Toyota Tacoma with Toyo Open Country mounted up.

Compare these to BFG T/A KO2, Falken Wildpeak, Yokohama Geolandar, Goodyear Wrangler, etc. but make sure to check speed and load ratings to get the correct Toyo Open Country tire for your Taco.

Also, the warranty on Toyo tires is interesting and arguably better. These have a warranty for a complete replacement for the first 25% of wear, and then prorated to the final 2/32” tread. Not bad at all. (cough) Ken Block uses Toyos.

Starfire Solarus HT All-Season

Starfire Solarus HT All-Season
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Let me first point out that General Grabber tires are a better budget option, but they cost a tiny bit more. These Starfire Solarus by Cooper tires are probably some of the most bought tires on the planet at the moment, and it’s because they don’t cost very much.

Would I put these on my Tacoma? Hell no! Well, maybe if I owned an old one from the early 2000s that just needed to get around town. No mountain driving. Then I might.

For just over a hundred bucks a pop, these come with a 50 thousand-mile warranty (not bad), and they’ll still safely carry you at speeds of up to 118 MPH which is plenty fast for your Tacoma.

These are technically mud and snow rated, but I wouldn’t rely on them in any conditions other than driving at slower speeds around town. And be careful, if you drive fast over sharp rocks, these are going to explode on you! Trust me, I’ve rallied plenty of cheap tires like this.

And just FYI, the best place to buy these is off Amazon (go figure, they’re cheap). Be sure to match the three-number tire size from your previous Tacoma tires to avoid any mishap when taking them to your local tire shop for mount and balance.

My opinion? Spending the extra money for Toyo, Falken, or Yokohama is your better option. Quality shoes for your Tacoma are worth it. All I’m saying is to buy 6 of these just to be safe. See also the Cooper Discoverer H/T plus.

Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac

Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Want to spend too much on tires on your Toyota Tacoma? That’s okay, Tacomas are nice—they deserve good tires. You’re in luck too, because these Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac are durable tires. Buying quality is money well spent.

Here are a few highlights of Goodyear Wranglers that you should be aware of before you buy:

  • 6-year/50 thousand miles warranty (not bad for offroading tires)

  • You can take a 30-day test drive

  • You can exchange for a different brand if you don’t like them

When choosing your Goodyear Wranglers, be sure to check out all the submodels to get exactly the right tire you’re looking for for your Tacoma. These have all-season, mudding, and all-terrain options just like Toyo, Falken, and Yokohama.

It doesn’t get as expensive or as nice as Goodyear, so here’s your high-end pick for the Toyota Tacoma tires.

Would I use these on my Tacoma? Naw. They are too expensive. Plus, I like to pair Japanese cars with Japanese tires. It’s nothing personal, I just think they function better together.

I will say though, that the TractiveGroove rubber compound technology on these Goodyear Wrangler radial tires is incredibly durable and impressive. I’ve noticed that you can open up the throttle on rough roads with nice tires, but if you do it with a cheaper set (like the Starfire Solarus) you’ll end up with a puncture that puts you more at risk of being stranded.

Yokohama Geolandar

Yokohama Geolandar HT G056
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Yokohama Geolandar tires are personally my second favorite choice for Tacoma tires. Travis Pastrana has been known to use these on his Subarus for rally car racing, and just imagine how well your Toyota will run with this setup.

My favorite part about Yokohama other than their reasonable price is how easy they are to mount and balance always. I never have to add much balancing weight to tires like these (unless the wheels are bent), and the feel of the rubber is always lovely on the hands when rolling a new set out to my bay.

See specific speed ratings for each of these tires. Any of the three below is plenty enough for reliable towing and moderate offroad use. Your choice depends on how much offroading you actually do.

Just like the Toyos, there are a few submodels of the Yokohama Geolandar, including:

The Geolandar All-Terrain provides leighway for faster highway driving speeds while still just absolutely eating up the bumps when offroading.

These do considerably better than other all-terrain tires on the highway because the treads are a bit closer together and they have zig-zag grooves that mimic circumferential grooves for quick water exits when hydroplaning.

The mudding tire you’ve always wanted without the extra price and other nonsense. The Japanese don’t mess around with transportation; they make the best. Buy these if you’re a mountain dweller who needs a reliable way back home during rainy/snowy conditions. You won’t regret it.

This highway all-season tire features an Orange Oil and Micro Silica technology that helps it grip well around sharp corners and ride smoothly on the highway. I think most Tacoma owners don’t realize how much they do drive on fast roads—that’s why I think you should go with a more practical tire like these. And, the H/Ts have a 70-thousand-mile warranty. That’s pretty spiffy.

Michelin Defender LTX M/S

Michelin Defender LTX
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

Is the journey your favorite part? I knew you were an overlander. The ‘LT’ in LTX stands for ‘light truck’, so that means they weigh less than tires designed for full-sized trucks. These will haul your Tacoma rooftop camper and all the goods for the weekend without blowing out or costing you too much money on fuel. Think of it as a happy medium.

I’m just gonna be honest, Michelin Defenders crush Goodyear Assurance All-Season on warranty mileage, ride comfort, smooth ride, everything. Sure, Goodyear Assurance is another solid all-season tire for the Toyota Tacoma, but they’re only guaranteed for 50 thousand miles. 

These Michelin Defender LTX crush the game on the highway for reals. They’re ultra comfortable at fast speeds, they won’t puncture when you do take them offroad, and you can pull/load reliably. For example, I wouldn’t trust a truck tire that costs a hundred bucks a piece for towing my 30-thousand-dollar boat. Quality deserves quality, and it just so happens that your Toyota Tacoma is the epitome of nice.

The only downsides I see to buying these light truck defenders are that they won’t be reliable in mud or sand, and they do cost quite a bit more than your cheapest option (Starfire Solarus). On the plus side, the extra money you pay for these tires pays off in the long run because they come with an impressive 70-thousand-mile warranty.

Read my complete review of the Michelin Defender LTX. Check out also the Michelin Defender LTX A/T2 for better offroad action. Michelin also makes great snow tires and performance tires, including:

  • Michelin X-Ice Snow

  • Michelin Pilot Sport

Again, you can’t go wrong with Michelin tires, so pick your favorite model, and have at it.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Toyota Tacoma?

I’ve driven in a lot of Tacomas. The tires are the only part of the suspension that comes in contact with the road. Here’s what to look for when buying new tires for the Tacoma:

Onroad/Offroad Capability

The best tires for the Tacoma should be versatile both on and off the paved road. Life is about going off the beaten path, and the Tacoma is what makes it happen for many people.

Rebates/Deals

Sometimes the best tires for your Toyota Tacoma are the ones that are on sale. Check Tire Rack and Amazon for the cheapest tires and other rebates that might save you money.

Speed Rating/Load Rating

Off-road tires don’t ride as fast (or as smooth) as all-season tires on the highway, so just a heads up.

Another common mistake people make is buying tires for their truck that don’t have the correct load rating— this results in tire blowouts when weight is added and/or the road temp heats up.

How Much Do Tires For Toyota Tacoma Cost?

The cheapest Tacoma tires (Starfire Solarus) cost about a buck-twenty a pop(no pun intended).

The most expensive tires (Goodyear Wrangler) run around $220 per tire, so you’re looking at about a four hundred dollar difference total from the cheapest to the most expensive Tacoma tires.

Don’t forget to pencil in the shipping and installation costs.

Four New Tires

$480 is the cheapest you’ll pay for four new Tacoma tires.

On the other hand, you’ll pay about $900 for a full new set of some beefy, higher-end tires.

Two New Tires

Two new Tacoma tires cost around $240, and two expensive Tacoma tires will run about $480.

Single Tire

Buying a single tire isn’t a normal occurrence since 4×4 vehicles like the Tacoma must have the tires replaced in pairs to prevent damage to the four-wheel-drive system.

Okay, I’ve replaced just one tire on a 2004 Tacoma, and nothing happened. But hey, it didn’t have much life left in it anyway.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Toyota Tacoma?

P245/75R16, P265/70R16, and P265/65R17 are three of the most common tire sizes for the Tacoma.

I always recommend stock tires and wheels, so I recommend either exact matching the existing three-number tire size from your existing tires or you could also plug in your Tacoma’s exact model and year into Tire Rack’s website for a complete set of tire options for your Taco.

How Long Should Your Toyota Tacoma Tires Last?

Your Tacoma tires will last for as long as the manufacturer warranty promises as long as:

  • You keep the tires inflated to spec
  • You rotate the tires from front to back every 3-5 thousand miles
  • Your Tacoma has perfect steering alignment
  • There are no suspension issues
  • You don’t run over a nail! (might be covered depending on the warranty)

Treat your tires right, and they’ll last a long time. Warning though, if you buy beefy offroading tires, and you only drive them on the highway, then they’re not going to last more than 30,000 miles. Buy the correct tires for your driving habits.

Over/underinflation is also very efficient at quickly eating away your Tacoma’s treads before you even notice what’s happening. I recommend filling your Tacoma’s tires with Nitrogen, and checking your tire pressures regularly, both visually and with a tire pressure gauge.

When To Replace Tires On Your Toyota Tacoma?

You should replace your Tacoma tires if:

Don’t peel out in the dirt. Buy new tires instead.

  • You have extremely uneven treadwear

Uneven tread wear is a common problem, and the shitty part is that if you continue to drive on lopsided tires, your suspension system will suffer.

Does The Brand Matter For A Toyota Tacoma When Replacing Tires?

You might also want to check out Firestone Destination as those come in stock from the factory. Other brands that will work at Kumho, Hankook DynaPro, Pirelli, etc.

Does the Year of Your Toyota Tacoma Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes. Don’t spend a thousand dollars on tires for an old Tacoma. Put some Starfire Solarus or General Grabbers on there and call it good.

On the other hand, treat your new Tacoma TRD Pro to the best tires out there. Toyo, Yokohama, Bridgestone, Goodyear, and Falken are my favorite picks for Toyota Tacoma tires.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Toyota Tacoma?

32.5-inch tires (17-inch rims or 285/70/R17) are the biggest you can do without a lift. Then again, if you decide to upgrade to some Bilstein shocks, Eibach pro, or any other type of lift kit, then you could potentially get some 20-inch tires to fit.

Frequently Asked Questions
Base model size for Tacoma 245/75/16 and you’ll see brands like Toyo Open Country and Firestone Destination on many stock Tacomas. It also depends on which tire your local dealer chooses.
You can put 32.5-inch tires on a Tacoma, but you’ll likely need to cut out part of the fender/fender guard. I wouldn’t recommend larger wheels/tires unless you beef up the suspension a bit—and remember, any time you beef up the suspension on your truck, you’re sacrificing drive train life, so that’s important to consider especially if you plan on reselling your Tacoma. Many buyers don’t want to buy a used truck that’s been jacked up.
Yes, bigger tires weigh more and cost more energy to push down the road. Imagine Fred Flintsone with a big old tire upgrade on the Flintmobile—he’ll be even more exhausted when he gets home!

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