Top 5 Best Tires For Toyota Highlander [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

Whether you’re a cute mom or a passionate overlander (or both), your Toyota Highlander deserves a spanking set of tires. And the best tires for Toyota Highlanders, in my opinion, have a healthy mix of on-road/offroad traction.

It never hurts to talk to someone who knows a lot about tires when you’re looking to buy a new set for your Toyota Highlander. Of course, there are plenty of different tire reviews floating around the internet trying to sway buyers’ opinions.

Do yourself a favor and buy the right tires for your Highlander. I made this tire review to relieve you of your skepticism by giving you solid advice based on my experience as an experienced auto mechanic and marketing buff.

People drive the Highlander for many different reasons, and that’s why there are many different tread designs to choose from. My favorite part about mounting up a set of tires on a Toyota Highlander is that moment when I spin the customer car around the block (the long way).

So, which are the best Toyota Highlander tires, then? Check it out:

Our Top Pick
Yokohama Geolandar HT G056
Yokohama Geolandar
4.5/5
4.5
Best Budget
Starfire Solarus HT All-Season
Starfire Solarus
3.5/5
3.5
Best High End
Pirelli Scorpion Verde
Pirelli Scorpion
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Continental Crosscontact LX25
Continental Crosscontact LX25
4.0/5
4.0
Best Tread Life
Goodyear Assurance Maxlife
Goodyear Assurance Maxlife
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Yokohama Geolandar

Yokohama Geolandar HT G056
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Most Toyota Highlander owners will agree that they prefer the perfect mix between smooth highway driving and capable offroad traction. That’s where tires like Yokohama Geolandars thrive.

In my opinion, Japanese tires are the perfect match for Japanese cars. Aside from obvious details like attractive sidewalls, I’ve noticed that tires like Yokohama Geolandars flow smoothly when mounted up to mid-size crossover SUVs like the Toyota Highlander.

The best part about Yokohama Geolandars is that there are different submodels to choose from to help you dial in your specific driving style. Choose from models like:

Yokohama Geolandar A/T are built for all roads, and they’re also relatively smooth at faster speeds despite the beefy treads. These also have an impressive 60 thousand-mile treadwear warranty which is unique for offroading tires.

Yokohama Geolandar M/T are heavy duty offroading tires that stay spinning in the worst of conditions. These will slightly reduce fuel efficiency, but they’re worth it for those of you who spend most of your days in the dirt.

Again, these Geolandar M/T are built for maximum offroad traction. For this reason, the mileage warranty is prorated based on the condition of the tire. Expect more road noise from beefy tires like these M/Ts.

Yokohama Geolandar H/T tires are built to withstand long road trips on the highway while also providing the durability to resist tire punctures from rocks. You’ll get the best mileage warranty when buying these all-season Geolandars compared to the others listed above (70 thousand miles).

If you like Yokohama Geolandars, you’ll also like Toyo Open Country and Falken Wildpeak.

Starfire Solarus

Starfire Solarus HT All-Season
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Starfire Solarus tires continue to scorch the market by being the cheapest and best option for tons of different cars.

And to be honest, these tires aren’t a bad pick for an older Highlander that does mostly around-town driving. Warning: These have a ‘T’ speed rating for safe speeds of up to 112 MPH, so don’t push it with these.

The downsides of buying these cheap tires are that they’re only guaranteed for 50 thousand miles (that’s low for highway tires), they won’t corner near as well as Pirellis or Michelins, and the general ride quality isn’t quite as good.

On the other hand, these are the perfect tires for people who drive Uber/Lyft because they’re cheap to replace and easy to keep on hand in the event of a blowout. If you drive carefully in the rain and use snow chains during winter conditions, then these will get you through til you have enough cheese to buy some real tires.

You can’t and really shouldn’t try to beat this price on a new set of tires for your Toyota Highlander. They run around a hundred bucks a pop and will work in pinch. I still say you should go with Continentals/General tires over these though if you want to pay less for decent highway tires.

Pick up four of these Starfire tires made by Cooper off of Amazon for the best price.

Pirelli Scorpion

Pirelli Scorpion Verde
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Pirelli Scorpions are the bebop of tires for any car. Why? Because they are fast, smooth, accurate, and tough. If you’re looking to rally hard on the highway and look good, I highly recommend you mount some Pirelli Scorpion all-season tires on your Highlander. You won’t regret it.

I’ve mounted up thousands of Pirelli Scorpions in my day, and I’ll tell you, there’s a noticeable difference in quality with these compared to other tires. Despite their tall sidewalls, they seldom require many balancing weights, and I’ve never seen an ugly blowout happen from a set of Pirelli tires.

These Pirelli Scorpions provide excellent rolling resistance in wet conditions, but they’re not snow tires. You’ll still want snow chains/snow socks for extreme winter conditions.

So why buy an expensive set of Pirelli Scorpions for your Toyota Highlander? To feel safer and handle better at high speeds, avoid changing to the spare with their run-flat options, and look sexier than the competition. These have an ‘H’ speed rating for speeds of up to 130 MPH which I think is perfect for cars like the Highlander because the ride isn’t as stiff compared to other high-performance all-season tires.

On the dealer side, any smart buyer who comes to take a look at a Highlander with Pirelli’s mounted up can quickly tell that the vehicle has been taken care of adequately.

The downsides of buying these Pirellis is that the run-flat option doesn’t come with a mileage warranty, and they’re overall going to cost you a lot more money. But hey, anything made in Italy is gonna cost too much.

Continental Crosscontact LX25

Continental Crosscontact LX25
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

I’m in love with everything about the Continental Crosscontact LX25. Continental tires are always reasonably priced for their superior quality, and they always mount up flawlessly. These are the best symmetrical tread pattern you’ll find on the market which makes them versatile for rotating and maintaining even treadwear.

These also follow suit with the other best all-season tires because of their ‘H’ speed rating (130 MPH max) which I believe is the Goldilocks of speed ratings for road trip comfort.

For the Highlander, I would choose between these and the Yokohama Geolandar H/T when picking out a good highway set because I’ve driven them hard and found them to be extremely reliable tires.

The Crosscontact LX25 specifically are made for both trucks and SUVs, so they’ll support the extra weight if you decide to pull a small trailer or add a roof rack to your Highlander. With their EcoPlus technology, these have been proven to improve fuel economy by 3.8% over the life of the tire, and their 70-thousand-mile treadwear warranty should be enough to pull the trigger on these.

Added note: These evacuate water much more efficiently than cheap tires like the Starfire Solarus listed above because of their multi-angle tread pattern and perfectly-designed circumferential grooves. For me, the more I drive on Continentals, the more I fall in love with them. Maybe you will too!

Goodyear Assurance Maxlife

Goodyear Assurance Maxlife
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

The Goodyear Assurance Maxlife are built for the long haul. It’s nice to have all-season tires that don’t melt down when driving cross country. Charles Goodyear invented tire vulcanization in the year 1839 which helped tires become significantly more durable and therefore last much longer. Needless to say, Goodyear has got it figured out for making tires that go for the long stretch.

To be honest, Goodyear isn’t my favorite tire brand because to me they’re nothing out of the ordinary when it comes to the tread design, but what does stand out is their longevity. These tires have a treadwear warranty for up to 85 thousand miles.

Because of their ability to endure, these are the perfect option for fleet owners and long-road trippers who want a reliable highway tire that’s not going to overheat and wear funny after 10 hours of driving.

Again, these aren’t my first pick. They’re not even my second. But they’re worth mentioning because of how long they last. But be careful, the Goodyear Assurance All-season tires aren’t the same, and they’re only guaranteed for 65 thousand miles. I’d still go with Yokohama or Continental for a Highlander, but that’s just me. Check the price on these, and make sure to match them with your specific tire size.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Toyota Highlander?

Here are a few tell-tale signs of a great tire selection for your Toyota Highlander:

Types of tires/Tread patterns

Be picky about which treads you choose because your decision will affect fuel economy and offroad traction capability.

Mileage warranties

The mileage warranties on tires recommended above range anywhere from 50-85 thousand miles. Other treadwear warranties are prorated depending on the condition of the tire. Make sure you read the fine print in the warranty info to avoid curveballs when buying new tires for your Toyota Highlander.

Sidewall height/Aspect ratio

I like the all-season feel for the Highlander because the taller sidewall height creates a lot of road comfort compared to sport tires. Check the middle tire number to help get a feel for how aggressive the tires will ride. Lower aspect ratio numbers are a bit bumpier but have more responsive handling.

Rebates

It’s never a bad idea to buy the set of tires that are on sale for your Toyota Highlander. Check Tire Rack, and take advantage of low prices—sometimes the price matters more than the brand.

How Much Do Tires For Toyota Highlander Cost?

The cheapest Toyota Highlander tires cost $100/tire, and the most expensive run around $220.

Four New Tires

$400 + mount and balance on the cheap side (Starfire Solaris), and $880 + mount and balance for the most expensive (Pirelli).

Two New Tires

$200-$440 + mount and balance. Don’t forget potential shipping costs if you’re buying online.

Single Tire

Don’t spend any more than $250 or any less than $100 for a single Toyota Highlander tire. Also remember, many Highlanders are all-wheel-drive requiring that tires be replaced in pairs to avoid causing damage to the AWD system and drivetrain.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Toyota Highlander?

Stock tires for a Highlander with 18-inch wheels are P235/65R18, but exact tire sizes vary depending on the submodel and year of the car.

Always use the VIN or other vehicle information when buying new tires (also check previous tire size) to avoid buying the wrong size.

How Long Should Your Toyota Highlander Tires Last?

If you keep your alignment/suspension perfect, your tire pressures inflated properly, and rotate tires every 3-5k miles, then your Highlander tires will last anywhere from 40 to 100 thousand miles depending on how you drive.

Check treadwear warranties for each specific tire. You’ll notice that warranties range from 50-85 thousand miles from brand to brand.

When To Replace Tires On Your Toyota Highlander?

Replace your Highlander tires every 40-80 thousand miles depending on which tires you buy.

Keep a tread-depth measurement tool in the glovebox, and don’t let your Highlander tread depths get below 2/32” (1.6mm).

If you do a lot of offroading, you might want to replace them even sooner. Also, if one or two of the treads is wearing unevenly, you might want to fix the steering alignment/suspension issues and install a new set to keep everything running smoothly.

Does The Brand Matter For A Toyota Highlander When Replacing Tires?

Yeah, I always put Japanese tires on Toyotas because I think they run smoother. Japanese brands like Toyo, Yokohama, and Sumitomo (Falken Wildpeak) are my favorites.

Other mentionable tire brands for the Toyota Highlander include Michelin X-Ice (winter tires), Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza, etc.

Does the Year of Your Toyota Highlander Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes, the older Toyota Highlanders have smaller wheel diameters.

Also, it’s not necessary to buy an expensive set of tires for an old beat-up Highlander. The cheapest option will work just fine in most cases.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Toyota Highlander?

Always plug in your Highlander’s year and submodel into Tire Rack’s website to see all compatible tire sizes. The tire selections with the largest middle number (aspect ratio) have the tallest sidewalls.

You’ll also notice differences in the first tire number which is the tire width measured in millimeters. The larger the number, the fatter the tire. If you have a custom suspension lift, you’ll be better off asking the tire shop which option is the biggest tire option depending on what work you’ve done.

Frequently Asked Questions
It depends on what the dealership/buyer decides to mount up. You’ll typically see brands like Yokohama, Toyo, Michelin, Continental, etc.
Go with the Yokohama Geolanders for on-road/offroad driving or Continental Crosscontact for a good highway set.
36 PSI for the front tires and 36 PSI for the rear tires. Always check the driver’s side door panel for PSI recommendations when inflating tires.

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