Top 5 Best Tires For Toyota Corolla [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

Yes, I’ve hit over 100 MPH in a Toyota Corolla. It was… scary! But not that bad. I’m just glad I had some good tires mounted up!

Luckily, the Toyota Corolla has a top speed of 117 MPH, but you’d better have some half-decent Corolla tires if you plan on doing any speed over 60 MPH. Of course, there are plenty of biased tire reviews floating around on the web. I know.

Trust me, I’m a Toyota enthusiast. I’ve mounted up plenty of tires for the Toyota Corolla, and I know the right tires for your situation.

So, which are the best tires for Toyota Corolla sedans? Check my top picks:

Our Top Pick
Hankook Kinergy ST
Hankook Kinergy
3.5/5
3.5
Best Budget
Starfire Solarus AS All-Season Tires
Starfire Solarus
3.0/5
3.0
Best High End
Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S
Goodyear Eagle Sport
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
GT Radial Champiro Touring A/S
GT Radial Champiro Touring A/S
3.0/5
3.0
Best Tread Life
Michelin Defender T + H
Michelin Defender T + H
4.5/5
4.5

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Hankook Kinergy

Hankook Kinergy ST
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

A high percentage of Toyota Corollas have Hankook Kinergys mounted up. For under a hundred bucks a tire, these satisfy the basic needs of your Corolla, plus they have a reasonable 6-year/70-thousand mile warranty.

Pick a set of four Hankook Kinergy up for a reliable road tire that’s not going to let you down around town and on the highway.

Hankook Kinergy tires are  ‘H’ speed rated for speeds of up to 130 MPH, so feel free to jam the gas pedal on the track in an attempt to blow up your Corolla. I like all-season tires that have ‘H’ speed rating because they’re generally a bit softer over the bumps compared to a more performance-style all-season tread.

I’m not going to lie, there’s nothing particularly interesting about Toyota Corolla other than the fact that they achieve incredible fuel economy. So, the only advice I can give about these Hankook Kinergys is to drive incredibly slow on remote dirt roads if you ever decide to haul off to Yellowstone or something.

Compare these to other tires like Michelin Defender T + H listed below and General Altimax RT43.

I’d typically go with most cheaper tires for a Toyota Corolla within reason, and I like the price of these Hankooks that run around a hundred bucks a tire.

Starfire Solarus

Starfire Solarus AS All-Season Tires
Our rating:
3.0/5
3.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.0/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.0/5
Snow Traction:
2.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

I can see why people put Starfire Solarus tires on their Toyota Corolla. If you think about it, the Corolla is so lightweight… it’s almost like driving in a go-cart. So that means it doesn’t necessarily need as tough of tires for driving on the road at slower speeds.

Say you’re an Uber driver, and you keep driving through a construction zone that gives you flat tires—that’s a perfect and fitting opportunity to throw down on a set (or two) of these Starfire Solarus tires just to have around for efficiency.

I’m actually surprised at how these haven’t gone up in price. But hey, you get what you pay for pretty much all the time. So, if you’re expecting to spend well under a hundred bucks a tire, then you should expect downsides like a low mileage warranty (only 50 thousand miles compared to 80 thousand on Michelin Defenders), average ride comfort at best, and a flimsier design than other tires that are built to go the long stretch.

Driving in the snow? Yeah, don’t use these. You want a quality tread compound that stays nice and soft when the temperatures freeze up. Try Japanese tire brands like Yokohama and Sumitomo for some decent quality Corolla tires that don’t cost too much. I think Japanese tires deserve Japanese cars, but these Starfire Solarus are kind of a no-brainer just based on the price.

Goodyear Eagle Sport

Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.0/5
Value For Money:
3.0/5

Yeah, I’m not going to recommend Pirellis for your Corolla (although that would be bitchin’!). These Goodyear Eagle Sports are my high-end choice because they’re both incredibly attractive and priced to perfection.

Nothing says Nascar like Goodyear Eagle, and these tires pay tribute to the quality of performance and ingenuity that Americans have. Besides, Charles Goodyear did invent tire vulcanization in the year 1839.

Oh, and did I mention these Goodyear Eagle Sport tires are built for speed? 168 mph/270 kph speeds, to be exact. So you can soup that Corolla up with the fastest intake possible or launch an electric bolt of fire down the freeway with a hybrid Corolla (joking).

Expect sport tires like these to have lower mileage guarantees (these have a 6 year/50 thousand-mile warranty), mainly because people who buy performance tires tend to have a habit of peeling out. Now, that’s not the case with the Corolla as it would be a miracle if it peeled out on a dry surface.

To summarize, these Goodyear Eagle Sport would be awesome on your Corolla for outstanding handling traction, but they’re not the practical choice because they’re going to cut into ride comfort and longevity.

GT Radial Champiro Touring A/S

GT Radial Champiro Touring A/S
Our rating:
3.0/5
3.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
2.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
2.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Did we say Starfire Solarus was the cheapest option? These GT Radial Champiro Touring tires might have them beat. These are another set of tires designed to save the sanity of uber drivers and fleet owners who constantly deal with flat tires.

Because of their ridiculously inexpensive price and decent mileage warranty (60 thousand miles), these GT Radial Champiro Touring A/S are about as economical as it gets for your Toyota Corolla.

Now, I’m only recommending tires these tires because they’re the price of a pair of jeans. That being said, these tires are made in China. Is that a bad thing? Absolutely not. China just isn’t a country regarded for its superior automotive manufacturing, so take my advice with a grain of salt.

If these blow out on you after a week, well, at least you didn’t spend too much. But maybe you’ll want to buy two sets to keep you rolling for the next 120 thousand miles. There’s always the chance that these tires will last you quite a while.

Again, these are fine for your Corolla at slower speeds around town, but I wouldn’t put these on a BMW or C Class and try to drive them past 80 MPH. Just like most other automotive parts produced in China, the quality control is highly unpredictable.

These Chinese special radial tires are a steal off of Amazon, though. Don’t believe me? Check the price.

Michelin Defender T + H

Michelin Defender T + H
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

I’ve been going in-depth on the Michelin Defender tire series as of late, and I’ve noticed that they’re quite superior to other tires in many ways.

Aside from their unbeatable 6 year/80 thousand-mile warranty, Michelin paid great attention to detail when designing these tires. As a result, they’re among the best all-season treads out there.

Michelin proves that the ‘H’ speed rating is the perfect tread compound for tires that last a long time, still go relatively fast (up to 130 MPH), and ride nice and comfortably.

Although they might look like your ordinary treads, they’re not. There are features about Michelin Defender T + H tires that set them apart from the rest. For example, Michelin’s MaxTouch construction provides noticeably better contact to the road by helping each tread block stay consistent through fast turns, braking, etc.

Another quality that sets Michelin Defender tires apart from the rest is their Intelli Sipe design. These might look like ordinary treads, but to be honest, their rain grooves and biting edges perform and last much longer than most other tires. The only tire I would buy over this for the Corolla would maybe be the General Altimax RT43.

I say pay extra for the good stuff especially when your safety is on the line. These Michelin Defender T + H are gonna keep you safe at higher speeds much more reliably than a cheap set of tires, so that’s why I say these are a good set to buy for teenagers or worker-bee employees who drive around all day because they’re not going to get too hot or cold and blow out.

See my in-depth review of Michelin Defender T + H to learn more.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Toyota Corolla?

I’ve mounted up tires on a lot of different Toyota Corollas. Here are a few things I found that should help you make the right choice when buying Corolla tires.

Rebates/Deals

Rebates and promotional deals are always a good thing to capitalize on, especially with cars like the Toyota Corolla that handle and drive well despite the brand of tires.

Cheap price

Honestly, don’t go overboard on Corolla tires if it’s more than 3 years old. You’re lucky anyway because Toyota Corolla tires cost less than tires for most other cars, and you can still get a quality set without breaking the bank.

Type of tire

I mostly recommend all-season/touring tires for the Corolla. Sport tires are going to be a bit bumpy on long rides, and off-road/all-terrain tires will produce a lot of ride noise and reduce your gas mileage.

All-season tires give you a quiet ride, great fuel efficiency, and they also last the longest.

Treadwear warranty

The mileage warranty on the tires I’ve recommended above for the Corolla vary greatly.

Some brands like our top pick (Hankook) are well-priced and designed to last 70+ thousand miles, while other questionable tire brands like the Starfire Solarus are only guaranteed for 50 thousand miles on a good day.

Always read the fine print in each tire warranty to get a good idea of what to expect.

Wheelsets included

It’s never a bad idea to order tires that are already mounted up to a fresh set of wheels. Corolla tires are so cheap that you could probably come up with a set of new wheels online that cost less than what it would take you for mounting and balancing at some shops.

Also, winter tires are great to have completely separate from summer tires for a quick changeout when the snow hits. Just an idea.

Run flat options

Never a bad idea to buy run-on-flat tires for people who are incapable of switching out to the spare. I know Michelin Pilot Sport (recommended above) comes with a run-flat option as well as other brands like Continental and Pirelli.

How Much Do Tires For Toyota Corolla Cost?

Our cheapest tire for the Corolla is the GT Radial Champiro Touring coming in around $60/tire, whereas our high-end choice (Michelin Pilot Sport) runs about $150/tire.

Here’s a quick ballpark estimate specific to quantity:

Four New Tires

Four new Corolla tires cost at least $250 for the cheapest brand and around $600 for the most expensive set.

Take shipping and installation charges into account. You could always call your local tire shop and ask how much they charge for the mount and balance of four new tires.

Two New Tires

Two new tires for a Corolla cost between $125 and $300 depending on the quality you desire. Don’t forget to consider shipping and installation costs.

Single Tire

Again, a single tire for the Toyota Corolla costs anywhere from $60-$150. Don’t spend over $200 for a single Corolla tire. Not worth it.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Toyota Corolla?

For little sedans like the Corolla, I always recommend replacing them with the same tire size. Use Tire Rack’s tool to plug in your Corolla’s model year and submodel—they’ll give you a complete list of compatible tire sizes.

How Long Should Your Toyota Corolla Tires Last?

Corollas are lightweight, so your tires should last up until their mileage warranty when maintained correctly.

Honestly, it’s up to you to save your tires from premature death. Here are some ways you can keep your Corolla tires maintained and running smoothly:

Tire rotations every 3-5 thousand miles

Rotating your Corolla tires from front to back will work just fine.

Overweight people, you might want to rotate your Corolla tires in an ‘X’ pattern to prevent excessive tire wear on the driver’s side. No offense. The Corolla is lightweight and I’ve seen my fair share of Corollas tilting heavily to one side—that puts a lot of wear on the driver’s side front treads.

Don’t forget to have your Corolla’s steering alignment fixed if you ran into a curb and the steering wheel turns without you touching it. Poor steering alignment destroys tire treads.

Proper tire inflation at all times

Always heed your TPMS (tire pressure monitoring) system, and check the driver’s side door panel of your Corolla for exact PSI requirements. Corolla tires should be around 38 PSI for the front tires, and 36 PSI for the rear tires.

Don’t forget to inflate the spare tire to spec also to avoid getting stranded (something like 60 PSI). I also like to fill my tires with nitrogen to help prevent flat spots and tire deflation.

When To Replace Tires On Your Toyota Corolla?

2/32” or 1.6mm tread depths is the rule of thumb for tire replacement on any sedan.

Always have a technician inspect your Corolla’s tires from eye level to help detect uneven treadwear, and take your mechanic’s advice when he tells you you’re ready for a new set.

Use your own judgment on when to replace your Corolla tires. Don’t let the treads wear down to where the sharp metal threads are poking out—they can cut your hand, and they can also cause a dangerous tire blowout.

In general, if you feel you’re not gripping the road as well as before, or you’re feeling weird vibrations in the steering wheel or the seat while driving, then it’s time to either get the tires replaced or have them rebalanced/rotated.

Does The Brand Matter For A Toyota Corolla When Replacing Tires?

Yes. Because lighter-weight cars like the Corolla don’t require high-quality tires, there are plenty of Chinese brands that produce tires at extremely low cost.

If it were me, Japanese brands like Yokohama and Sumitomo win in a landslide over any Chinese tire.

You might also find that many American and European-made tires are too expensive and not practical for the Toyota Corolla. Keep in mind, that the tires I’ve recommended above are the easiest to access. There are plenty of good choices beyond the five listed above.

Other tire brands you might want to check for the Corolla are Kumho, BFGoodrich G-Force, and Bridgestone Ecopia EP422 plus. The best winter tire for the Corolla is probably Bridgestone Blizzak.

Does the Year of Your Toyota Corolla Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes, the older Corollas have much smaller wheels. For example, the first Toyota Corolla produced in 1966 had 14-inch wheels while newer models like the 2022 Corolla have 16, 17, and 18-inch wheel diameters.

Aside from wheel size, you might want to clean up older Corolla wheels to help them perform better. Corroded wheels can contribute to tire deflation, and they can also be less true than newer wheels making them harder to perfect on the tire balance machine.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Toyota Corolla?

Unless you plan on installing a 3-inch suspension lift, you’re going to want to stick with the exact stock-size tires for your Corolla. You might be able to get anywhere from 18-20 inch wheel sizes to work with modded suspension. Again, use Tire Rack’s website as a resource.

Frequently Asked Questions
Decent cheaper tires list above are Starfire Solarus and GT Radial Champiro, but my favorites for the Corolla GLI are Yokohama AVID, Falken, General Altimax RT43, and Michelin Defender.
P205/55/R16 is one example tire size for the 2017 Toyota Corolla, but it depends on the exact Corolla submodel. Always check the tire size on the sidewalls of the tire, and match it exactly when buying new tires.
It depends on which tires you buy. Treadwear warranties are specific to tire brands, and some dealerships/tire shops also provide tire warranties.

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