Top 5 Best Tires For Toyota Camry [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

Your Toyota Camry has likely saved you thousands on gas. Now it’s time to spoil it with some new tires.

You might be asking yourself: “why is my Toyota Camry so perfect?” Because it’s true, they literally never have problems—except for that casual and expected explosion of its aluminum engine block at the 300 thousand mile odometer mark (guaranteed).

But until then, you’d better plan on driving it. And tires, oh, you’re gonna need the right tires.

Since the Camry is one of the most driven cars on the road, there are plenty of tire reviews online aiming to persuade (or dissuade) you into buying another tire brand. Well, you’re lucky I’m here to give you my unbiased opinion.

What are the best tires for Toyota Camry sedans? I’ve driven Toyota Camry old and new. Shoot, I even had an old stick shift Tercel. Scroll to find out which tires you should get:

Our Top Pick
Continental ContiProContact
Continental ContiProContact
4.5/5
4.5
Best Budget
Starfire Solarus AS All-Season Tires
Starfire Solarus
3.5/5
3.5
Best High End
Pirelli Cinturato P7
Pirelli CintuRato P7
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Hankook Kinergy GT
Hankook Kinergy
3.5/5
3.5
Best Tread Life
Michelin Defender T + H
Michelin Defender T + H
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Continental ContiProContact

Continental ContiProContact
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

I choose Continental because I’ve had great success with them over the years. As a technician, I love Continental tires because it never feels like there’s anything wrong with them when mounting them up. They always spin nearly perfectly when put on the tire balance machine.

Downsides to buying Continental ContiProContact? The only I can think of is that they won’t perform as well as snow tires in the winter, and they won’t handle quite as well as sport tires during the summer. These are all-season tires, and they do awesome at expelling water in rainy weather conditions. Slap some snow chains on in the winter if necessary, and they’ll do just fine.

Symmetric, notched rib treads, wide circumferential grooves, twin steel belts, yadda yadda yadda. All tires are basically made the same these days. These just happen to have a superior tread compound that lasts much longer than usual thanks to the awesome engineers at Continental tires. For example, these tires have more than 800 arched edges on the sides to bring more active contact to the road.

The best part about buying Continental tires is driving on them after you’ve switched out your old tires. Oh, and did I forget to mention that these puppies come with a 6-year/80 thousand mile treadwear warranty? Yeah, you’re not going to find any better than that. Oh, and the price! These are only like a Benjamin a pop. For brand new tires? Get outta here. I’m buying these right now.

Secret: General Altimax RT43 is another phenomenal tire made by this same company.

Starfire Solarus

Starfire Solarus AS All-Season Tires
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

How do these Starfire Solarus all-season tires manage to keep selling out of stock? They must be good. Well, and even if they’re not that good (they’re not), they’re ultra cheap.

These tires are something you’d find at the bargain store. But there’s good news. Thousands upon thousands of people are buying these tires on Amazon. I’m serious, it’s ridiculous. And there is an astonishing lack of poor reviews. There is nothing astonishing about the physical characteristics of these tires, but you’re okay slapping these on your older Camry.

I wouldn’t put Starfire Solarus on a Corvette, but that’s not why we’re here. They’re perfect if you need to pass safety inspections on a budget. Honestly, their 50-thousand-mile warranty is pretty unimpressive compared to Continental or Michelin. But that’s why they cost well under one hundred dollars a piece.

These are a great option if you only drive around town at slower speeds. Don’t try to rally these on the highway, and by god, don’t go ripping down a remote canyon road without a spare tire—they will get punctured by a sharp rock. In other words, these Starfire Solarus are grandpa speed approved.

Anyway, here’s your cheapest option for all you thrift store shoppers and self-reliant college kids (mad props) that need literally just something to put on their old Camry.

Pirelli CintuRato P7

Pirelli Cinturato P7
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
5.0/5
Dry Traction:
5.0/5
Ride Noise:
2.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.0/5

Why do I keep recommending Pirelli tires? Because high-end buyers usually go with these whenever I see a clean car come into the shop. When mounting up these CintuRato P7 run-flats, I always cringe at how stiff the sidewalls are. These things are sturdy as hell!

Pirelli run-flats are sometimes hard to mount onto the wheel, but they also require little to no balancing weights once you get them on the tire. For the driver, they’re extremely reliable at high speeds, and they corner like a boss.

One of the things customers always complain about when driving on run-flat tires is how stiff they are over small bumps. Yeah, they’re stiff. But they’re not going to blow out and completely rip off of your Camry’s wheel at 100+ MPH, either. And yes, those V6 Camry have a decent amount of horsepower!

Some Pirellis might be firm riding on your butt, but damn do they completely eliminate road noise!

Would I put these on a Camry? No way Jose. It’s not designed for high performance like these tires. But I would maybe put them on my Grandpa’s Camry so he doesn’t have to put himself in danger if he needs to change out the spare. Instead, my gramps can just drive to the tire shop and let them handle it if one of the TPMS sensors pops up telling him the tire is flat.

The only thing that kind of sucks is that run-flat tires don’t come with a treadwear guarantee, and most tire shops refuse to plug them if you run over a nail for “insurance” purposes. You could always choose a Pirelli tire for your Camry that isn’t a run-flat option.

Have fun with your new superior handling.

Hankook Kinergy

Hankook Kinergy GT
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Now that I’m thinking about it, I’ve seen quite a few Toyota Camry sedans with Hankook Kinergy mounted up. You Camry owners sure are economical, so how could I guess that you’d choose my economical tire choice when changing out treads?

I had a hunch. I would still buy these for my Camry though, and I usually don’t say that about most cheap tires. Thinking logically, it’s not like the Camry has a turbo charger (okay, maybe in the 1980s) so burning rubber is basically impossible in these things.

And I don’t know about you, but I’m not trusting an older Camry to save my life with its “amazing” airbag technology. I drive slow whenever I get behind the wheel of this four-door sedan. And hey, if you have a two-door Camry coupe, I salute you. I’m a fan.

One crisp Benjamin Franklin for one sparkly brand new tire? Hankook knows how to do business. If you notice, the most bought tires online are running around a bill these days. They also happen to be among the cheapest ones.

According to Tire Rack’s website, you can try out a set of Hankook Kinergy for 30 days, and exchange for a different set of Hankook if you don’t like them. Which might be a good idea if you want to switch out to a sportier or beefier set. A free trial sounds nice, but make sure you really like the brand before buying.

These tires are made in South Korea, and they’ll do up to 130 MPH with their ‘H’ speed rating.

Michelin Defender T + H

Michelin Defender T + H
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
5.0/5
Ride Noise:
5.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
5.0/5
Value For Money:
5.0/5

The only radial tire that maybe lasts as long as the Michelin Defender is the General Altimax RT43 (or Continental I listed above as our top pick), but this tire is a bit sturdier in my opinion. No siree, you’re not going to find many tires for the Camry that comes with an 80 thousand-mile warranty.

If you think about it, it’s a perfect fit. A reliable tire for a reliable car. Even their prices are relatable. The Defender T + H run somewhere in the middle price range of tires (currently about a buck fifty a tire), but the quality and longevity they provide gives them so much more value.

If I was a fleet vehicle owner, everyday commuter, Uber driver, etc. I would much rather spend the extra money for the durability that a set of Michelin Defenders provide for my Camry with the confidence in knowing that they’re not going to have any major issues.

You know the tires are engineered well when the company starts naming the technology. For example, the Intellisipe zig zag sipe design helps the Defenders achieve maximum surface area in terms of road contact. You’ll also notice the high silica content in these tires that repel water much better than your cheaper options.

It’s always good to weigh your pros and cons when buying nice things (like these Michelin Defender T + H). Good aspects of these tires are superior engineering and reliability, and they’re much longer lasting.

The downside of buying Defenders are that they’re still more than double the price of our cheapest pick. But let me tell you, the quality of the Defenders is worth every penny. Michelin is one of the oldest and most reliable tire brands, so it’s hard to say that these aren’t my top pick.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Toyota Camry?

I don’t normally say this, but just buy the cheapest tires you can get for the Camry.

Sure, the sportier V6 Camry has some pull, especially with that attractive new Direct Shift-8AT 8-speed transmission, but quite honestly you don’t need anything special for the Camry when it comes to tires.

Treadwear warranty

Treadwear mileage is a huge thing to look for when buying for the Camry. You’ll notice that high-end all-season tires (like Continental, General Altimax RT43, Michelin Defender, etc.) come with ultra high mileage guarantees (somewhere between 70 and 80 thousand miles) while cheap run of the mill Camry tires are only guaranteed for something like 50 thousand miles.

Different types of tires have different warranties. Run-flat tires typically don’t have a mileage warranty, whereas both all-terrain tires and summer tires generally run lower mileage guarantees. All-season/touring tires generally last the longest, regardless.

Run-Flat Capability

I would say about 1% of Toyota Camrys have run-flat capable tires, but they’re still a great option to consider for helping incapable people not to get stranded on the highway. Run-flat tires like Pirellis for your Camry allow the driver to drive safely on a completely flat tire at slower speeds to the tire shop instead of the need for swapping out to the spare.

Aspect Ratio

The middle tire number, for example, P205/65V/R16 represents the tire sidewall height, and you’ll notice that a higher aspect ratio number creates better ride comfort when riding over bumps. the Camry typically uses some nice and fat all-season road tires as an OEM part because they have smaller wheel diameters.

In comparison, an Acura TL might drive faster and handle better than the Camry, but the Camry is about twice as comfortable on long road trips, and a lot of that has to do with the aspect ratio of the tires.

Sales/Rebates

Always check sales first for cars like the Camry. These don’t need immaculate treads to drive satisfactorily.

How Much Do Tires For A Toyota Camry Cost?

Don’t buy used treads for your Camry because they won’t be covered under warranty, and new ones don’t cost that much more.

Here are some quick ballpark numbers:

Four New Tires

It costs ~$272 + tax + shipping +mount and balance for your cheapest option. Realistically, you’ll spend around $400-$500 for a cheap new set of Camry tires.

You’re looking at $800 + shipping + installation for a complete set of the highest quality Camry tires.

Two New Tires

Cut those prices in half, and you’re looking at around $140 for two cheap tires and $420 for two new expensive tires + shipping + mount and balance on your Camry.

Single Tire

Your Camry’s cheapest option for four new tires is currently Starfire Solarus priced at well under 100 bucks a pop (currently $68 a tire). On the expensive side, the Pirelli RunFlat we recommended cost a bit over 200 bucks per tire.

Be sure to replace your all-wheel-drive Camry’s tires in pairs to avoid damage to the drivetrain.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Toyota Camry?

There are so many different sizes of Toyota Camry tires from submodel to submodel, so it’s absolutely vital that you know where to look for the tire size on your previous tires.

Also, like I said below, Tire Rack’s website will spit you out a complete number of compatible tire sizes for your specific Camry if you give it the correct submodel and model year.

How Long Should Your Toyota Camry Tires Last?

I would say over 90% of Toyota Camrys have all-season tires mounted up, and all-season tires last for 50 thousand miles on a bad day. If you buy some nice treads like the Michelin Defender or Continental ContiProContact, you’re looking at 80+ thousand miles before you replace tires again.

Warning: No brand of tires will last more than 30 thousand miles if you fail to properly inflate your tires, and you don’t have them rotated every 3-5 thousand miles. Tire maintenance is key for tire longevity.

When To Replace Tires On Your Toyota Camry?

It’s hard to properly inspect the insides of the tire treads on your Camry without lifting it off of the ground. That’s why I always recommend a tread depth report when taking it to the shop for an oil change.

Tires become dangerous to drive on when the tread depth gets below 2/32” (1.6 mm), so stick a penny in there to see if Abe Lincoln’s head is completely visible—that’s the simplest way to check.

Does The Brand Matter For A Toyota Camry When Replacing Tires?

Not as much. The Camry is for slow driving style and achieving great fuel efficiency, so most all-season/grand touring tires will do the trick. I will say that I like to pair Japanese tires with Japanese cars. They seem to be made for each other. Look for brands like Toyo, Yokohama, and Sumitomo for the best driving results.

Other tire options you might want to check out for the Camry are Michelin Premier A/S, General Altimax RT43, Mastercraft Stratus, Kumho Solus, Cooper CS5 Ultra Touring, Bridgestone Turanza, etc.

Does the Year of Your Toyota Camry Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yeah, I buy cheaper tires for older cars, and nicer tires for newer cars. Just in case you didn’t know, there are a few different submodels of the Camry, including:

  • L
  • LE
  • SE
  • XLE
  • XSE
  • etc.

You might think that one size fits all, but one thing I learned about vehicle manufacturing is that there are a ton of different variations in just one common vehicle model like the Toyota Camry.

The Camry might seem cookie cutter, but they’re a lot more different than you think from car to car. Always remember your Camry’s submodel and model year when buying parts.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Toyota Camry?

Plug your specific Camry submodel and year into Tire Rack’s website, and let it spit you out all the possible options.

You’re looking for the first highest of the two tire size numbers (P205/65V/R16). The first number is the tire width, and the second number is the aspect ratio, or height of the tire.

The third tire size number is the size of the wheels.

Toyota Camry sedans come with a surprisingly wide range of rim sizes compared to other sedans. Your stock Toyota might have anywhere from 16-inch wheels all the way up to 19-inches in diameter.

Frequently Asked Questions
My advice is to use a nice all-season set (like Michelin Defenders) and keep snow chains/snow socks on hand for when it snows. But sure, Japan produces some very cool hybrid weather tires that are meant for both the highway and good traction offroad, so go check out tires like the Falken Wildpeak Trail A/T Trail, Maxxis Bravo, Nexen Roadian, Yokohama Geolandar, etc.
Check on the inside driver’s door panel to be sure, but 36 PSI is typically the recommended PSI for Toyota Camry. If you’re driving with lower-profile sport tires, it’s perfectly okay to run them at 40 PSI (don’t go any higher) in summer conditions, and I always lower people’s sedan tires to 30 PSI during harsh winter conditions to improve road traction.
Stock Toyota tire brands depend on what the dealer orders, but Toyota typically uses Japanese tire brands like Toyo, Yokohama, and Sumitomo (Falken). I give Japanese tires two thumbs up.

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