Top 5 Best Tires For Subaru Forester [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

What are the best tires for Subaru Forester crossover wagons? I’ve hand-picked your five best options to make it easier on you.

Most Subaru Forester tire reviews you see out there are biased to a sickening level. Hey, I’m an outdoor lover. And as a Subaru Forester owner, you probably dabble in nature also. Check out these five best tires for your Subaru Forester, and decide which one is best for you—they’re all a tiny bit different.

I think the specific tires you choose for your Forester ultimately depends on how much offroading you do. Scroll down to see the best deals + quality when buying tires for your Subaru Forester online (according to my professional opinion). Let’s start off with my top pick:

Our Top Pick
Falken WILDPEAK A/T TRAIL All-Terrain Radial Tire
Falken Wildpeak A/T Trail
4.0/5
4.0
Best Budget
Mastercraft Stratus AS
Mastercraft Stratus AS
3.5/5
3.5
Best High End
Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Yokohama Avid
Yokohama Avid
3.5/5
3.5
Best Tread Life
General Altimax RT43
General AltiMAX RT43
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Falken Wildpeak A/T Trail

Falken WILDPEAK A/T TRAIL All-Terrain Radial Tire
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

This Falken Wildpeak tire made by Sumitomo is likely the most sold tire for Subaru Forester, Outback, Crosstrek, Legacy, etc. because of its strategic balance between price and awesome quality. To save money, I recommend picking thee up online, and taking them to your local tire shop for a quick mount and balance.

With me, I use the binary system when choosing tires. It’s either 1 — I would, or 2— I wouldn’t put them on my vehicle. These Falken Wildpeaks are a total one because they have a long-lasting mileage warranty (65 thousand miles).

If you have any doubt, look closely at the tread pattern in these tires (or any set of tires) to make the right decision. When inspecting the treads of the Falken Wildpeak A/T Trails, you’ll notice that they incorporate a continuous center rib of a road tire with the grippy independent tread blocks of an offroading tire.

These are the perfect treads for your Subaru Forester because they’re going to allow you to navigate basically any road efficiently. The only real downside I can see is that they are a tiny bit heavier and less aerodynamic compared to all-season and summer tires, so get ready to lose out a bit on gas mileage—honestly not enough to be worried about, though.

See our extensive review of Falken Wildpeak A/T3W, but keep in mind that the A/T3W is a full-fledged all-terrain tire while the A/T Trail is a hybrid between an all-season highway tire and beefy offroading tire.

Mastercraft Stratus AS

Mastercraft Stratus AS
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

These Mastercraft Stratus All-Season tires happen to be your cheapest choice for new Forester tires. Forking out a Benjamin per tire isn’t a bad solution for a brand new set in any situation. These Mastercraft have a 50 thousand-mile warranty that will give you plenty enough wiggle room to buy some badass all-terrain tires on the next go-round without breaking the bank.

Honestly, you could buy a cheap set of tires from your local tire shop that still has half the tread life in them for about this price. The problem with buying used tires to cut spending is that they don’t come with a warranty, and they also don’t last as long.

Would I personally buy these tires for my Forester? Sure, but only if I did I would be extremely careful when driving on dirt roads. And I would be ultra-careful driving in snowy conditions as these are more commonly used on the road and not the trail.

Some quick features of these Mastercraft Stratus tires are deep lateral shoulder slots that help wick away water during the rain, a spiral nylon overwrap, and a smooth, round design that should wear quite evenly if you stay on top of your tire inflation and rotation.

Please also note that you might not find these on Tire Rack’s website, so you’ll likely have to buy them off of Amazon.

Yokohama Geolandar AT G015

Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Want to rip trails and burn the competition on the highway at the same time? Try these Yokohama Geolandar out for size. These are an all-terrain design with better handling than what you would normally see from a bug heavy set of BFG all

If you’re a Subaru enthusiast trying to get the most out of your Forester in terms of performance, then this is the right choice for you. These Geolandars burn it up on the highway, and they burn it up even more in the dirt and light snow.

These Yokohama come with an impressive 5-year/60-thousand-mile warranty (that’s phenomenal for an all-season tire), and they also have a solid ‘H’ speed rating for safe travel of speeds up to 130 MPH.

Reasons not to buy this tire? It’s slightly more expensive than the cheaper options, you might see a slight reduction in fuel economy, they’ll have a tiny bit more ride noise when compared to dedicated road tires, and they’re also not ultra-high performance tires rated for track driving and whatnot.

Regardless, for wet conditions, offroad driving, and snow, these are the tire to go for. And the best part is that they aren’t even that expensive compared to some high-end tire picks.

I would put either these Geolandars or the Falken Wildpeak on my Subaru Forester for the most comfortable and agile driving ability. For an ultra-high performance at high speeds, you could also try something like a Pirelli P-Zero out for size.

Yokohama Avid

Yokohama Avid
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Want a smooth ride? You might find Yokohama Avid stock on your Subaru Forester, and that’s likely because they’re a touring tire with a low price and decent quality. Chances are, you’re not going to find your dream tires when you first buy a Subaru from the dealership or previous owner. You’ll need to branch out to buying Yokohama Geolandar or Falken Wildpeak (or something else similar) if you’re looking for that versatile on-road/offroad traction.

On the other hand, these Yokohama Avid are pretty attractive if you mostly drive your Forester on the road. These have a special CV2 silica tread compound, and their symmetrical design makes them easy to mount, easy to rotate, and easy to unmount to flip around if needed when rotating.

I always notice the quality of the rubber when mounting up Yokohama tires. These have a ‘T’ speed rating (for up to 118 MPH), so the rubber is nice and soft (faster tires have harder rubber). That means these drive extremely smooth on the highway, and they’re a commuter’s dream because they’ll boost your fuel economy and last up to their 65 thousand-mile warranty for sure if you take care of them.

Reasons to not buy this tire would be because they lack offroad performance, they’re on the inexpensive side, and they won’t handle as well as performance road tires. These are for commuters driving at mediocre speeds, but they’re great tires for the Subaru Forester by all means, and I love how attractive the Yokohama sidewalls look when mounted on any car.

General AltiMAX RT43

General Altimax RT43
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

General Altimax is made by the legendary Continental company, and they give you a mountain of reasons why to buy these tires.

For one, these babies come with a 75-thousand-mile treadwear warranty. Whaaa?? That’s unheard of. Especially since you’ll likely be raking these rubbers up against the rocks at least half the time in your Suby.

Another user-friendly reason to go with these General Altimax RT43 is that they have visual treadwear indicators that make it easy to spot uneven treadwear and alignment issues. You’ll find two tabs on each side of the treads for a quick inspection, and you’ll also notice that the words ‘replace tire’ appear printed on the bottom when they’ve worn down past safely usable condition.

Some downsides about buying the General AltiMAX RT43 include decreased performance offroading compared to an all-terrain and less cornering capability compared to a sports tire. Other than that, these General Altimax RT43 are great at improving ride comfort and smoothness over small bumps. You’ll also likely notice a quiet ride compared to most other tires.

These will work just fine in light snow/slush but don’t forget to pick up a set of snow tires or snow socks for your Forester if you plan on driving in a blizzard. I still give these a four out of five though.

Make sure to match the three-number tire size of your Subaru Forester to your new set of General Altimax RT43 when buying since these are sold in a large variety of different sizes.

See our complete General AltiMAX RT43 review to learn more.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Subaru Forester?

Okay Dr. Seuss/Where’s Waldo, here are some things to spot when buying tires for your Subaru Forester:

On-road/Offroad traction

Since the Subaru Forester has a masterfully designed symmetrical all-wheel-drive system, you want to capitalize on maximizing your offroading ability, and that’s exactly why ‘I’ve recommended some boss tires like the Yokohama Geolandar and Falken Wildpeak with tread designs that allow you to shred dirt roads and fast highway speed at the same time.

Sure, all-season tires will work great on the Forester, just drive slow over rocky roads. Also, be careful of buying beefy all-terrain tires that will wear out fast on the highway and drastically reduce your gas mileage—find the happy medium. Michelin Crossclimate is another sweet hybrid-type tire that would go nicely on your Forester.

Mileage Warranty

Mileage warranties on Forester tires vary drastically with my recommendations. For example, your cheapest option (Mastercraft Stratus) is nice and cheap, but they only come with a 50-thousand-mile warranty.

On the other hand, General Altimax RT43 is only a tad bit more expensive, and they’re guaranteed about 50% longer tire life (75 thousand mile warranty).

Rebates

Sometimes the best tire brand is the one on sale. Take advantage of deals when you see them. Your Forester doesn’t need the nicest tires if you’re driving it mostly on the road.

Durability

Aside from mileage warranty, look for durability. For example, all-season tires with slower tire speed ratings have soft rubber that punctures easily when driving above 30 MPH on most dirt roads. Just because Yokohama Geolandars and Falken Wildpeaks have lower mileage warranties doesn’t mean they’re less durable. They’re in fact much more durable, and it just so happens that the manufacturer likely cuts the warranty mileage because of the fact that drivers ride all-terrain tires much harder than all seasons.

Summer/Winter tires Swap

Some Forester owners like to buy a separate set of winter tires and wheels for an easy swap when winter comes. I like the idea, and it also allows for a more aggressive set of summer tires/wheels. Something to consider. Slap some Pirellis or Michelin Sport tires for the summer and Bridgestone Blizzak or Pirelli P Zero tires for the winter.

How Much Do Tires For Subaru Forester Cost?

The cheapest you’ll pay for new Forester tires is one hundred dollars a tire. And that’s by going with the Mastercraft Stratus I recommended above. You could also try Starfire Solarus as a cheap option for under a hundred bones a tire.

On the other hand, a high-end tire for the Subaru Forester shouldn’t cost you more than 200 bucks a pop. Spending more than that would be foolish because there are some phenomenal tires for about a buck eighty.

Four New Tires

$400 bucks is a reasonable price for four new tires for your Subaru Forester (Mastercraft Stratus or Starfire Solarus). You’ll need to factor in shipping and the cost of mounting/balancing in your local tire shop, so leave a bit of wiggle room.

Expect to pay about $800 for a quality set of tires when buying online. We’re talking brands like Yokohama/Falken all-terrain hybrids, Pirelli, Michelin, Goodyear, etc. Again, factor in the cost of shipping and local installation.

Two New Tires

$200 is a good price for two new Subaru Forester tires at the low end of things. $400 is reasonable for two tires but plan on spending more like $500 for two ultra-nice tires for your Forester.

Single Tire

Since these are all-wheel drive vehicles, you’ll want to replace the tires in sets. Either replace both the front or both the back tires if you’re on a budget. The only single tire you might buy would be the spare tire, and that might cost you anywhere from $100-$300 depending on the quality and if you need the wheel included.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Subaru Forester?

You’ll find stock sizes like 225/60R17 and 225/55R18 on Subaru Forester crossovers. That means they come with either 17 or 18-inch rims.

How Long Should Your Subaru Forester Tires Last?

Anywhere from 30-80 thousand miles depending on the tire.

Your Forester tires will last a long time or only a short period of time, and it all depends on how you treat them.

As a friendly reminder, always keep your tires inflated to spec (see the inside of your Forester’s driver’s door panel), and rotate your tires every 3-5 thousand miles for the best results. It’s also never a bad idea to inspect your treads during every oil change to identify possible suspension/alignment problems.

And of course, sometimes you drive out of the shop with new tires only to run over a nail in the sidewall of the tire—this is usually covered under warranty.

When To Replace Tires On Your Subaru Forester?

The general rule of thumb is when the tread depths are down to 2/32” (1.6 mm). You could also stick a penny in there and see if Lincoln’s head shows completely through.

I might replace Forester tires sooner than later because I know you Forester drivers are adventurous. Don’t get stranded out there with a flat because of old tires. This ain’t no Toyota sedan.

Does The Brand Matter For A Subaru Forester When Replacing Tires?

Yes, brand matters. I think that Japanese tire brands (like Yokohama, Sumitomo, Toyo, etc.) make the best tires for the Forester and any other Subaru for that matter.

These Japanese tires aren’t for the autobahn but rather for even performance basically anywhere you decide to drive at reasonable speeds—they’re practical and very effective, so that’s why I like them.

Does the Year of Your Subaru Forester Matter When Buying New Tires?

Sure, I say don’t spend as much on tires for a Subaru that has over 200 thousand miles on it. Remember, these Subaru boxer engines are awesome, but guess what? They have aluminum blocks. FYI, a Japanese aluminum engine will last reliably until about 300 thousand miles, then its toast. It’s not like those cast iron Mercedes engines that last up to a million miles, so unless you’re willing to undergo an engine swap, prepare for your older Subaru to crap out on you after at least 250k miles.

For your newer Subaru Forester owners, buy some nice ass tires for your Suby. It will raise the curb appeal and overall value of the vehicle for the buyer if you ever decide to sell.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Subaru Forester?

You could maybe pull off 20-inch wheels and tires if you were to put a 3-inch lift in your Forester, but I wouldn’t recommend it. (the rim size is the third tire size number aka 225/55/R18).

I recommend plugging in your Subaru Forester model and year into Tire Rack’s website and choosing from the different sizing options they give you. It’s that simple. Tires with a higher middle number will have a higher sidewall while lower middle numbers might be sportier and surely lower to the ground.

Frequently Asked Questions
No, replacing your Forester tires in pairs will work just fine if you’re on a budget/if it’s not necessary. Just remember that you want identical tires on each axle to prevent damage to the AWD system.
It depends on the dealer’s choice, but you might see Yokohama Avid, Michelin Primacy, Bridgestone Potenza, Goodyear Assurance Maxlife, etc. as well as other all-terrain tires like I’ve recommended above.
Sure, we’ve recommended some great all-terrain options above, but they’re more hybrid-style all-terrain tires. I don’t recommend strictly all-terrain tires on your Subaru Forester because they’ll wear down fast on the highway. Go with the trail-style tires (Yokohama Geolandar & Falken Wildpeak A/T Trail) that are specifically designed for crossovers like the Subaru.

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