Top 5 Best Tires For Nissan Altima [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

Finding the best tires for Nissan Altima sedans online isn’t as hard as it sounds. Don’t get scammed into thinking one brand is the way to go—I made it easy for you to choose by finding the five best options.

Want the cheapest tires to make your Altima skip down the road? We found them. Or maybe you don’t give a sh*t about the price and want the best treads for rallying fast… either way, here’s my expert opinion of the best tires for Nissan Altima.

Treat your little rice rocket to a new set of tires, why don’t you? Here are the best Nissan Altima tires at the best prices. I recommend you pick up a set online and run them over to your local tire shop for installation.

Our Top Pick
General Altimax RT43
General Altimax RT43
4.5/5
4.5
Best Budget
Falken Ziex ZE950 A/S Tire
Falken Ziex ZE950 All-Season
3.5/5
3.5
Best High End
Pirelli PZero All Season Ultra High Performance
Pirelli PZero All Season Ultra High Performance
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Continental ProContact TX
Continental ProContact TX
4.0/5
4.0
Best Tread Life
Michelin Defender T + H
Michelin Defender T + H All-Season
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

General Altimax RT43

General Altimax RT43
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

Not sure how Continental tire company managed to kill it so hard with these General Altimax RT43 tires. I’m asking myself how I could opt for any other tire when being presentewith d these, and no, it’s not going to happen. I would choose the RT43 every time for the Nissan Altima.

Sure, the Altima is quick. But it doesn’t have some twin-turbo engine and ripping transmission that requires some expensive high-performance tires. No, what your Altima needs is those modest tires that handle well, don’t cost a fortune, and last a long time—that’s these. Make the smart decision.

I recommend these General Altimax RT43 as the best tires for your Nissan Altima because these tires handle the biz. I like everything about the General Altimax RT43. They’re smooth, not ridiculously priced, and they even have visual treadwear indicators that make it easy to spot alignment issues, uneven treadwear, etc.

Twin cushion silica tread compound on these babies makes bumps smooth, and although they don’t have the speed rating as some of the faster tires on our list (‘T’ speed rating of up to 118 MPH), that just means that they’re a softer tire, so you’ll feel the bumps less in your rear end.

The continuous center rib and biting edges on these RT43 tires give you great control when cornering and driving in wet conditions as well. These tires will even tell you when it’s time to change them out by displaying ‘replace tire’ somewhere on the tread.

RT stands for road touring, and this is a tire that will increase your fuel economy while improving ride comfort with its relatively chunky sidewall. Simply, there’s a reason why these are some of the most sold tires in shops around the globe—their combination of quality and longevity at an ultra-reasonable price makes them pretty hard to turn down.

For under a buck fifty a pop, you can’t go wrong with these on your Altima. A 75,000-mile warranty?! If you haven’t bought these already, you’re blowing it! You can slam that ‘check price’ button now. You’re going to like what you see.

Falken Ziex ZE950 All-Season

Falken Ziex ZE950 A/S Tire
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Want cheap tires for your Nissan Altima that don’t slide off of the wheels? Boom, here you have the Falken Ziex ZE950 all-seasons as your easy solution.

These Asian burners (made in Japan) cost under a hundred bucks a pop, and they’re honestly the perfect fit for anyone who owns an old Altima and just needs something to get around town.

I kind of don’t like the tread pattern on these tires because they’re too asymmetrical. That makes it hard to remount them in case of uneven tread wear, and those jagged sipes become razor sharp when tire feathering happens (like if you don’t rotate the front tires). I’ve pulled off these tires after 50,000 miles and seen some ridiculously oblong-shaped rubber that can’t be comfortable to drive on. As for mileage warranty, these have a 65,000 guarantee, so if you do buy these tires make sure you rotate them regularly to avoid premature tire death.

On the upside, Falkens are designed to be (allegedly) safer at faster speeds compared to the RT43, but the downside to that is that the rubber is harder and the bumps won’t be as comfortable, especially in a low-riding car like the Nissan Altima.

I’ve always found these tires to feel cheap when touching them with my hands before mounting them onto a car. But hey, they are cheap! And they’ll work in a pinch. I still say spend a tiny bit extra on the General Altimax RT43.

Pirelli PZero All Season Ultra High Performance

Pirelli PZero All Season Ultra High Performance
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

I’m not just recommending Pirelli as the high-end choice just because they sound like they’re made by the Sicilian mafia or something. True, Pirelli is an Italian company, and if you have an unlimited budget, you should throw down on these tires for your Altima.

Do Pirellis look attractive? Yes. Do they perform even better? Yes. And I’m not just saying that. I’ve mounted up thousands of these tires, and they are better than any other tire I’ve ever driven on (except for maybe Continental).

With the durability of Pirelli PZero tires, you can push your Nissan Altima to high speeds without having to worry about a dangerous blowout. One of the downsides of this specific set of Pirellis is they don’t specify a treadwear warranty anywhere (most Pirelli warranties are pretty solid), but chances are you won’t need to bank on the warranty anyway due to the quality.

One thing I particularly like about the Pirellis is that their tread grooves are super wide—that gives an insane steering response, and it also evacuates water that much faster when driving over large puddles at high speeds.

Pirelli is making you an offer you can’t refuse with these Pirelli PZero. Once you try them, you probably won’t want to willingly drive on any other tires. By the way, these are ‘V’ rated for speeds of up to 150 MPH, so try not to burn out too hard in your VC-Turbo Altima! See also Pirelli Cinturato P7 All Season Plus if you’re looking for a strict summer tire.

Continental ProContact TX

Continental ProContact TX
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

In my opinion, the ‘H’ speed rating on these Continentals (for speeds of up to 130 MPH) makes them perfect because the rubber isn’t so stiff that they’re uncomfortable to drive on. And who needs to drive faster than 130 MPH in their friggin Altima? Its max speed is 130 MPH, so that’s convenient.

I love the way these tires feel when mounting them up. The quality of the rubber is hands down the best I’ve felt. They’re easy to mount, they never require a lot of balancing weights (that means their quality control is on-point), and the funniest part is always the test drive after putting them on cars like the Nissan Altima.

I also dig the simple complexity of the tread pattern on these tires. The sipes have distinct curvature that launches water away from the tires when driving over water at high speeds, and another fun fact is that I hardly ever see uneven tread wear with these tires (keep your suspension and alignment intact regardless).

But seriously, these tires only cost slightly more than our cheapest option (Falken Ziex) but their performance and quality are noticeably better. They might not last quite as long as high-end Michelin or Pirelli, but come on, their 65-thousand-mile warranty holds firm. They’re just all-around a great pick for the Nissan Altima.

Continental is originally a German tire manufacturer (that’s where the car was invented), so you can be damn sure they maintain the quality and stand behind their warranty. See also Continental Purecontact LS.

Michelin Defender T + H All-Season

Michelin Defender T + H
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Incredibly hard to match the Michelin Defender in terms of longevity. These tires come with an impressive 80 thousand-mile warranty meaning you won’t need tires for a hot minute after throwing down on these treads. If you commute daily in your Nissan Altima, these are the right tire because they have a bit better traction than most tires, and their consistency speaks for itself. These aren’t the type of tires that quickly lose air or easily wear uneven (fill them with nitrogen for even better results).

I always notice a drastic decrease in road noise after mounting these tires up, especially on lower-riding vehicles like the Nissan Altima. Their ‘H’ speed rating (safe for speeds of up to 130 MPH) coincidentally matches the top speed of the Nissan Altima, and as I said earlier, high-performance tires aren’t necessary for this car. I would much rather have a comfortable tire like the Defender that eats the bumps in the road and enhances fuel economy.

You get what you pay for always, and if you pay 50% more for these Defenders, you’ll get double the mileage compared to our cheapest option (Falken), and you’ll also likely prevent uneven wear and bumpy rides because these tires are way more forgiving if you forget to rotate them.

Take advantage of the Evertread compound that Michelin has put so much research into providing by driving the crap out of these tires—just make sure to keep your tire pressures on spec to avoid uneven wear. Another good option is the Michelin Premier A/S.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Nissan Altima?

One great thing about the Altima is how low it sits to the ground, so tire quality doesn’t matter quite as much at lower speeds.

How Much Do Tires For Nissan Altima Cost?

Our cheapest option for the Altima (Falken Ziex ZE950) sells for around $75 at its cheapest price, and our more expensive options like Pirelli and Michelin will cost around $200 a tire (worth it).

Four New Tires

Your cheapest price is about $300 plus mount and balancing at your local tire shop when buying our cheapest set of Falkens, so plan on spending around $400 for your cheapest option, and around $1,000+ for a complete set (give or take).

The Pirellis mentioned as our high-end option for this model typically cost under $200 per tire, so you might end up only paying around $800 for the Nissan Altima.

Two New Tires

Our cheapest option for the Altima (the Falken Ziex) costs around ~$90 a tire, so you’ll end up paying something like $200 for the tires plus installation costs.

Our high-end option for the Altima (Pirelli P Zero) is reasonably price at around $120/tire, so expect to pay something like $300-$400 total for two new tires mounted and balanced.

Single Tire

Don’t replace one single tire on your Altima if it’s an AWD (all-wheel-drive) model, or unless it’s the spare (which you should replace every 6 years).

What Tire Size Is Best For A Nissan Altima?

The tire size? Wait, which number is that? Don’t overcomplicate things. Plug in your Altima’s year exact model into the Tire Rack site and let it spit you out all of the potential tire sizes that will fit your vehicle’s wheels.

Just a heads up: if your Altima has aftermarket wheels, the tire size could be slightly different. In that case, you’ll want to match the tire size exactly.

How Long Should Your Nissan Altima Tires Last?

Don’t buy crap tires for your Altima. If you do, they’ll only last 40 thousand miles or so. You want tires that will last at least 75 thousand miles (like the General Altimax RT43 we recommended).

Ultimately though, it depends on your driving style. If you’re always hammering the accelerator pedal and slamming on the brakes with your lead foot, then your tires are going to last half as long.

The same goes if you don’t rotate your tires every 3-5 thousand miles and keep them properly inflated at all times. Don’t let that TPMS light keep blinking people—if you do, you drive on deflated (or overinflated) tires for too long your tires will wear out in a matter of 10 thousand miles or even less.

When To Replace Tires On Your Nissan Altima?

Your Nissan Altima might stay in control a bit better than most cars if your worn tires blow out, but I still wouldn’t risk it.

This is a relatively low-riding car that makes it hard to inspect the insides of the tire treads regularly, so the best way to inspect tire treads is when you take it for an oil change.

Tires should always be replaced when the tread depths get down to 2/32” (two thirty seconds of an inch). Or if you want, you can stick a penny in your treads with President Lincoln’s head going inside. If Lincoln’s head is completely showing, you need new tires.

Frequently Asked Questions
Some other tire brands you might want to check out for your Nissan Altima include Bridgestone Turanza Quiettrack, Bridgestone Blizzak, Bridgestone Potenza, Cooper CS5 Ultra Touring tire, Yokohama, anything Goodyear, etc. The type of tire also matters. For example, don’t put all-terrain tires on your Nissan Altima unless you’re installing Bilstein shocks, strut spacers, and plan on taking it to the North Pole. Yes, I’ve done that to people’s sedans.
Yes, older Nissan Altimas need new tires much more urgently. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recommends replacing tires that are 6 to 10 years old. Don’t drive around with old tires that are a ticking time bomb for blowing out on you. Other than that, the year doesn’t matter. Just match the correct tire size.
Stock wheels for the Nissan Altima are between 17-19” (inches). You can find the biggest possible tire size specific to your vehicle (compare the first two of three tire size numbers) on Tire Rack’s page when selecting the make and model.

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