Top 5 Best Tires For Hyundai Tucson [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Joe Steffen
By Tire Expert, Joe Steffen

Are you searching for the best tires for a Hyundai Tucson?

Look no further. I have seen countless customers in your shoes and not know what tire is best for their vehicle.

I have serviced and sold tires to hundreds of customers who own these reliable Korean-made cars. You will find an option recommended for every category someone would be looking for in Hyundai Tucson tires (even all-terrain tires).

You will find out why these five options are the best, and after reading through the reviews, I also compiled all the things essential for you to know about tires on Tucson’s.

Let’s get started with these tire reviews!

Our Top Pick
Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady
Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady
4.0/5
4.0
Best Budget
Westlake SU318 H/T
Westlake SU318 H/T
3.0/5
3.0
Best High End
Michelin CrossClimate2
Michelin CrossClimate 2
4.0/5
4.0
Best Off-Road
Toyo Open Country AT3
Toyo Open Country A/T III
3.5/5
3.5
Best Tread Life
Pirelli P4 FourSeasons Plus
Pirelli P4 FourSeasons Plus
4.5/5
4.5

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady

Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Tired of switching out your Tucsons tires every season for winter tires?

The Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady is the perfect option for year-round traction in every season. They come with a three-peak mountain snowflake rating that allows the tread compound to stay flexible in freezing temperatures.

Featuring an asymmetric tread pattern that does a great job of packing snow in the tread makes snow traction almost as safe as winter tires.

Goodyear is really starting to cement itself as a premier tire manufacturer again. Over the last decade, they have tended to not release new tires to compete with other tire brands like Bridgestone and Yokohama.

The treadwear will not be longest lasting, only being backed by a sixty-thousand-mile treadwear warranty. But what it lacks in tread life, it more than makes up in traction, handling, and ride comfort.

Hyundai Tuscon’s don’t have the most comfortable ride, so finding a tire that makes it feel even the slightest bit smoother makes a world of difference, which is what the WeatherReady will provide.

Anyone who wants the most well-rounded tire available for the Tuscon at a fair price should go with the Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady.

Westlake SU318 H/T

Westlake SU318 H/T
Our rating:
3.0/5
3.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Noise:
2.5/5
Snow Traction:
2.5/5
Ride Comfort:
3.0/5
Tread Life:
3.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Not everyone has thousands of dollars to shell out for a set of tires. And with tire prices higher than ever, I want to provide an option practically anyone could afford.

The Westlake SU318 H/T can be founding sizes for the Tucson, on average, for under a hundred dollars per tire.

Backed by a fifty-thousand-mile warranty, this option has great value in terms of miles per dollar. If maintained, you can easily receive the miles claimed in the warranty.

Cheap tires have drawbacks, and with the Westlake, it will be the wet traction and ride noise.

Even though it is an all-season tire, it is possible to hydroplane when driving at high speeds in wet conditions. The tread design features very thin siping that doesn’t allow water to evacuate quickly enough. I recommend going below the speed limit when heavy rainfall occurs.

Low-quality tires have tendencies to wear out unevenly. These uneven wear patterns will generate a lot of road noise, making an unpleasurable driving experience.

If you can look past the downside to Westlake SU318 H/T for the price, this could be the right tire for you. Make sure you can because they will not come with a ride trial, so once they go on your car, you own them for good.

Michelin CrossClimate 2

Michelin CrossClimate2
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
5.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
5.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

You can’t have a top-five list if you don’t include Michelin tires. The Michelin CrossClimate 2 is an all-weather tire like the Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady.

It carries a three-peak mountain snowflake rating to effectively maintain traction in the snow. The 3PMSF means the rubber compound stays flexible in freezing temperatures.

Nowadays, you won’t see many tires come with a directional tread pattern. These patterns have become known for being loud and prone to uneven wear. Michelin has engineered a silica compound that prevents road noise and uneven wear.

It has what is called piano key harmonizing tread blocks. If you look at the tread, it will resemble a piano keyboard with a staggered pattern. This helps prevent noise because it’s generated at different decibels, not allowing it to build up.

The other benefit to this tire is how effectively it evacuates water and packs snow inside the tread channels. It makes hydroplaning on wet roads and sliding in snowy conditions challenging.

Ride comfort always has been Michelin’s bread and butter, and the CrossClimate 2 will provide the same level of comfort you have come to know from this brand.

Say goodbye to your X-ice snow tires if you go with the Michelin CrossClimate 2.

Toyo Open Country A/T III

Toyo Open Country AT3
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.0/5
Snow Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Some people enjoy the look that all-terrain tires offer but for those who put the Tucsons All-Wheel Drive (AWD) to the test. The Toyo Open Country A/T III will offer exceptional on and off-road performance.

Toyo has become a flagship brand in the off-road community. Its aggressive design and stylish sidewalls make anyone’s head turn.

All terrains will have the most diverse traction in weather conditions. The Open Country A/T III will easily grip through snow, making winter tires unnecessary in harsh winter conditions.

The Open Country has an excellent treadwear guarantee of sixty-five thousand miles. This is one of the higher warranties for an all-terrain tread.

If you decide to go this route, I cannot stress how important it will be to perform routine tire maintenance. Tire rotations, tire pressure checks, and correct wheel alignments will ensure the high performance they offer.

Since they have chunky tread blocks, they are incredibly prone to uneven wear patterns.

The worst thing that can happen with them is cupping. Cupping will diminish the ride quality so fast it’s not even funny. This will be caused by the blocks wearing in a wave-like pattern, which causes the tread to make uneven contact with the road.

It can be so loud you can’t even drown it out with the radio.

For anyone who wants to change the look of their Tucson or take it off trails, the Toyo Open Country A/T III is the way to go.

Pirelli P4 FourSeasons Plus

Pirelli P4 FourSeasons Plus
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
5.0/5
Value For Money:
4.5/5

If the Hyundai Tucson is your vehicle you use for everything. Whether commuting, dropping kids off, or grocery getter, you want a tough tire to last through all those miles.

The Pirelli P4 FourSeasons Plus is the right choice for you.

Pirelli backs this touring tire by a whopping ninety thousand mile guarantee. I received quite a few complaints that it does not last its warranty. But those consumers who make these claims never have the proper tire maintenance records to show it wasn’t the tire’s fault.

Just by not rotating your tires can cut the mileage in half. And about 75% of consumers who took care of the P4s received or came close to the ninety thousand mark.

Long tread life wasn’t the only factor in this decision.

I also considered traction and ride quality. Pirelli is known for how well their performance tires handle, and the P4 reinforces this claim. Creating minimal body roll on tight, high-speed turns.

Snow traction was lackluster, but as is expected, with a touring tire all-season. I recommend a snow tire like Bridgestone Blizzak WS90 for severe winter driving.

If you need a radial tire to last a long time and still provide excellent wet and dry traction, handling the Pirelli P4 FourSeasons Plus will be the best choice.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Hyundai Tucson?

To find the best tires for your Hyundai Tucson, you need to look for the tire size, speed rating, and tread pattern. You will discover why these things are essential below.

Tire Size

The correct tire size will ensure that your Tucson will perform as designed and prevent the incorrect load carrying capacity from being installed.

Speed Rating

Installing a tire with a lower speed rating than recommended on a vehicle will cause the tread to wear out faster and negatively affect handling.

Tread Pattern

Different tread patterns will have adverse categories they perform well in.

The directional tread will offer the best-wet weather traction and handling.

Symmetrical offers the best tread life and comfort.

Asymmetrical patterns will be the most well-rounded but offer slightly lower performance compared to directional and symmetrical tires’ excelling categories.

How Much Do Tires For Hyundai Tucson Cost?

I shopped for price quotes online at retailers like Discount Tire, TireRack, and Amazon to provide some estimates on how much tires will cost you.

These prices will be the cheapest to the most expensive.

Four New Tires

A set of new tires will run up a bill between $350 to $1,000.

Two New Tires

Only two new tires will cost anywhere from $200 to $550.

Single Tire

If you only need to replace one of your tires, be prepared to shell out $125 to $350.

NOTE: Replacing anything less than four matching tires on the AWD (all-wheel drive) models is not recommended. Doing so could result in premature drivetrain failure.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Hyundai Tucson?

The best size will be the factory fitment. Vehicles are designed to perform with a specific width and diameter tire, and changing it could have negative effects.

How Long Should Your Hyundai Tucson Tires Last?

Options like the Pirelli P4 could deliver as many as ninety thousand miles, and cheaper alternatives like the Westlake could see as little as forty thousand miles.

When To Replace Tires On Your Hyundai Tucson?

You will want to replace the tires when the tread depth is at 4/32nds or if the rubber compound is six years old.

Refer to the DOT on the tire to identify the age. The year of the tire will be the last two digits of the DOT number.

Does The Brand Matter For A Hyundai Tucson When Replacing Tires?

Brands like Kumho, Hankook, and Uniroyal will have lower quality and shorter life expectancy. Tires are you get what you pay for products, and the more you cheap out, the less performance you will get.

Does the Year of Your Hyundai Tucson Matter When Buying New Tires?

The year of a Tuscon may dictate what you spend on tires since older models will be more prone to mechanical issues.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Hyundai Tucson?

Unfortunately, the factory tire size options will be the biggest tire you can fit on Tucson without modifications.

Frequently Asked Questions
Tires that come original on a Tucson will not come with a warranty through Hyundai. Some manufacturers will offer a guarantee on OE tires, but you must check with the tire manufacturer to obtain this information.
There is no factual information to back up this answer. I have surmised that factory tires have softer rubber compounds to provide smoother rides when test driving. Soft rubber compound wears out much faster.
Here are the tire sizes depending on the trim level of your Tucson: SE- 225/60R17; SEL- 225/60R17; Value- 245/45R19; Limited- 245/45R19

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