Top 5 Best Tires For Dodge Charger [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

The Dodge Charger is one mean monster that needs the best tires possible to hang on during burnouts.

For reals, who drives a Charger that doesn’t absolutely romp the gas pedal out of the starting gate? Burning out is one of the main reasons why people love the Dodge Charger, so replacing the tires is more of a norm.

Take my advice from years in the shop. Here’s a list of the five best tires for the Dodge Charger:

Our Top Pick
Continental ExtremeContact DWS06
Continental ExtremeContact DWS06
4.0/5
4.0
Best Budget
Fullway HP108
Fullway HP108
3.0/5
3.0
Best High End
Pirelli P Zero
Pirelli P Zero
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Firestone Fire Hawk AS
Firestone Fire Hawk AS
3.5/5
3.5
Best Tread Life
Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S
Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Season
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Continental ExtremeContact DWS06

Continental ExtremeContact DWS06
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Why do I recommend Continental ExtremeContact Sport as the top pick? In my experience, these are about the best damn tires you can put on a sports car.

They handle super well in wet conditions, they last a long time, and the tread compound is impeccable—what more can I say? I’ve mounted up a brand new set of these tires in our shop on a sports car in a 3-foot snow storm and rallied them down our drag strip at fast speeds with ample amounts of control.

Our other tire experts agree that these are some of the best tires for any sports car or even an SUV, although we should point out that the ‘X’ shaped treads in the middle of the tire that provide better snow and rain traction are the first to wear down.

Regardless, I’ve rallied these tires on the fastest of cars in the worst of snowy canyon conditions, and let me tell you—they’re the best you’re gonna find for any reasonable conditions (granted they’re not studded winter tires). Check the ‘D-W-S’ treadwear indicators on a used set of Continental Extreme Contact to see if they’re still suitable for dry, wet, and snow conditions (the letters wear off one at a time as the tires wear down).

Read our complete guide on Continental ExtremeContact tires to learn more!

Fullway HP108

Fullway HP108
Our rating:
3.0/5
3.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.0/5
Snow Traction:
2.5/5
Ride Comfort:
2.5/5
Tread Life:
2.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Fullway HP108 all-season performance radial tires are honestly a great tire for Dodge Charger owners who like to burn out. These Fullway HP108 tires for your Dodge Charger cost under $100/tire making them the perfect option for buying two complete sets for the price of one just in case you run over nails.

Despite their cheaper quality, these are still a solid option for the Dodge Charger and I really like the control these treads provide. That’s the good thing, honestly, about low-profile tires, is that the wheel does more of the work in keeping a smooth ride going.

These Fullway HP108 tires have a ‘W’ speed rating making your Charger safe for speeds of up to 168MPH. I highly doubt you’ll take your Charger any faster than that since it’s top speed is technically 147 MPH. Another thing I dig about these tires is that they don’t completely neglect wet conditions like some road tires. These still have solid siping that evacuates water to keep you in control when driving on wet surfaces.

The only real downside is that there’s no apparent mileage warranty, and they’re made in China. That means there’s really no quality guarantee or refund if you buy these and they only last a few thousand miles.

So, if you like to peel out and are constantly replacing your Dodge Charger’s tires, these are a popular pick amongst Charger Scat Pack owners.

Pirelli P Zero

Pirelli P Zero
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

The nicest cars that I’ve worked on have always had Pirellis mounted up. Well, Pirelli or Continental.

Either way, these Pirelli P Zero are the boss ultra high-performance tires if you want to maximize your Dodge Charger steering response and tire longevity.

Unfortunately, these don’t come with a treadwear warranty. That’s because customers who buy these have cars like the Charger that can rip off the tire treads in a single punch of the gas pedal. Well that, and people who buy Pirelli tires don’t care about the price. These are the ultra-luxury set.

Would I put these on a Dodge Charger? For sure. But there are other sets I like better, and quite honestly, the Charger for me doesn’t handle that well. It’s more of a muscle car, so I would go for something a bit cheaper personally.

One thing is for sure, though, and that’s the top-of-the-line ride quality that these Pirellis provide at faster speeds. You’re not going to have to worry about a wild blowout, and you can opt for a run-flat version of the tire that you can drive on even if the tire is completely deflated.

Try the Pirelli P Zero All Season Plus model if you’re looking for enhanced traction in wet conditions. Mount these Pirelli P Zero up on your Dodge Charger, and it’ll be swingin’ like Frank Sinatra with its Italian-American style.

Firestone Fire Hawk AS

Firestone Fire Hawk AS
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Firestone Fire Hawk is not my favorite tire. I loathe the summer version of the Fire Hawk because the tread pattern is just ugly and its tread design is more for aesthetic than it is for performance.

The Firestone Fire Hawk AS (all-season), on the other hand, I can dig. They’re not going to whip with the style of Pirellis, but they’ll do in a pinch for just over $100 per tire.

In particular, I like its bulky treads and reliable 50-thousand-mile warranty. These asymmetrically designed all-season sport tires come with different speed ratings of ‘V’, ‘H’, and ‘W’ depending on how firm you like your setup (‘H’ speed ratings are typically a bit more comfortable over the bumps).

What I like about these treads is they have a large number of tread grooves for a sports tire. Now, you’re not going to have very much fun burning out with the Firestone Fire Hawk AS, but you will enjoy steering dominance in rain storms and light snow conditions.

The price on these bad boys? Not bad at all. You’re looking at a price slightly above a hundred bucks for a solid set of tires from an originally Japanese company (Bridgestone). In my opinion, these are a much better pick than the Fullway HP108 (made in China) listed above.

Firestone Fire Hawk AS are great for aggressive drivers because they provide the security of good handling at fast speeds while maintaining an inexpensive price that won’t stress you out when it’s time to buy a new set.

Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Season

Goodyear Eagle Sport A/S
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Season is my favorite choice after the Continental ExtremeContact for Dodge Charger or any other sports car.

Again, I’ve recommended mostly all-season tires designed for high speed because I think they’re the right tire for most Charger owners. These have insanely good control when driving in the rain, they’re decent for light snow, and they come with enough beef on the treads that they can survive a hot burnout or two.

My favorite part about these Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Season tires is their four circumferential grooves that are seemingly the size of the Grand Canyon compared to other tires. These also have full-depth sipes (unlike other sport all-season tires) that maintain great wet traction down to the last millimeter of tread depth.

50 thousand miles is a super reasonable warranty for sports tires, and that just proves the quality and reliability of these tires. Learn more about Goodyear’s RaceWrap Construction technology to learn more about why these tires handle so well.

It’s true, if you spend a bit more for quality parts, they’ll end up saving you money in the end. You’re also more likely to get a ~$200 rebate when buying name-brand tires like these. Buy these for your Charger if you want NASCAR quality.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Dodge Charger?

From my experience, there are two extreme personalities of people who buy the Dodge Charger. You’ve got the young car lover who’s heavily in debt, likes to burn out, and wants to look cool. And yeah, Dodge Chargers are way fucken cool.

Then you’ve got your experienced baby boomers who earned it when the getting was good. They still like to burn out in their Dodge Charger (cause who doesn’t), but they don’t do it near as often as to cause the treads to melt off the wheel.

At any treadwear rate, here are some go-to checkpoint items to consider when buying tires for the Dodge Charger.

Rebates

Check sites like Tire Rack first because they provide you with every compatible tire size and they also offer rebates that can save you a couple of hundred bucks.

Type of tires

Pay attention to the tread patterns when buying, and make sure to buy tires adequate for your driving style. For example, if you drive in wet/winter conditions often, you’ll get better traction with all-season sport tires compared to performance summer tires. Here’s a bit of insight about each tire type:

Performance summer tires

Summer tires are a sweet option for the Dodge Charger, but they aren’t designed for wet conditions. All you Southern California/Southwest peeps, these are a good option for you.

All-season sport tires

Most All-season sport tires/grand touring have ‘x’ shaped treads and more sipes to help evacuate water and light snow. These are for you mountain people and east coasters who have to deal with cold and wet conditions on the regular. All-terrain tires for a Dodge Charger? Yeah, that’s not really practical.

Treadwear warranty

Pay attention to how long these tires are projected to last based on their mileage warranty. Some of these tires I’ve mentioned above don’t come with a guarantee, so keep an eye on the fine print before buying to make the best decision.

Wet road performance

With tires as low profile as Charger tires, you’ll start noticing a big difference in water performance between tires.

Just remember that summer treads aren’t a great option if you live in places like the Pacific Northwest where the beautiful roads stay wet—that’s where the super-high performance all-season tires walk in the room.

How Much Do Tires For Dodge Charger Cost?

From under $100 per tire to over $300 per tire, here’s a quick ballpark estimate on what to expect when buying new Charger tires. Don’t forget to pencil in the price for the mount and balance. Let’s take a look:

Four New Tires

$450 is the cheapest price for four new Dodge Charger tires while ~$1200 is the most expensive.

Two New Tires

$225 is the cheapest price for two new Dodge Charger tires while ~$600 is the most expensive option.

Single Tire

We’ve priced single Dodge Charger tires from $100-$300+ per tire.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Dodge Charger?

Just like most other car models, the Dodge Charger’s wheel and tire specs vary from model to model.

The best tire size for your Dodge Charger is easy to find—just plug your vehicle info into Tire Rack’s website for a complete list of compatible sizes (always check the tire size on the old tires).

Don’t forget that there are different submodels of the Dodge Charger including the SXT, SRT, Rallye, SE, R/T, etc.

How Long Should Your Dodge Charger Tires Last?

Dodge Chargers ain’t no rice burners. These things haul ass, and their tires heat up to as hot as the women who drive them. That means they eat through tires like a savage.

When To Replace Tires On Your Dodge Charger?

Honestly, since Charger tires are so low-profile, not much is going to happen if your tire blows out. Just burn them all the way down til you blow one out, but don’t forget to carry the spare or use run-flat tires.

Does The Brand Matter For A Dodge Charger/Dodge Challenger When Replacing Tires?

Brand only matters with Dodge Charger tires if you want longevity.

The Charger itself is a wide-bodied beast with plenty of power, so name-brand tires like Continental, Pirelli, Continental, and Michelin last a bit longer (depending on how you drive) because of their advanced technology and machines.

Other tire brands to check out for your Dodge Charger Scat Pack Widebody include BFGoodrich G-Force, Michelin Pilot Sport, Hankook Kinergy PT, etc.

Does the Year of Your Dodge Charger Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes! The first 1966 Dodge Charger had 14 and 15-inch wheel diameters while the heavily modified Dodge Charger of today has stock wheel sizes anywhere from 17 to 20 inches in diameter.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Dodge Charger?

Plug your Charger’s model year/VIN into websites like Tire Rack for a complete list of compatible tire sizes (check your previous tire size for the wheel size). P305/35Y/R20 is the stock size for the largest 20-inch wheels.

Frequently Asked Questions
I’d go with Continental ExtremeContact WS06 or Goodyear Eagle Sport All-Seasons. Fullway HP108 is a cheap and good option.
Some typical stock tire sizes for the Dodge Charger are 235/55/R18, 245/45/R20, and 305/35/R20.
The largest current rim diameter for the Dodge Charger is 20-inches.

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