Top 5 Best Tires For Chevy Suburban [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

You’re likely going to want a more all-season set of tires for your Suburban. I’ve seen Surburban’s mounted up with big rims and sport tires, and I’ve also seen some mean mudding tires on these versatile American SUVs, but most are comfortable with all-weather tires.

Which exactly are the best tires for Chevy Suburban driving? It depends on the way you move.

And hey, if you’re still driving an ancient Surburban from the 60s (or even the 30s) well then I salute your pocketbook at the gas station.

One thing’s for sure, the Chevy Suburban has been a reliable family tank over the past years, and the best tires for Chevy Suburbans make the ride even better.

Check out my top five tire choices for any Suburban:

Our Top Pick
General Grabber HTS 60
General Grabber
4.0/5
4.0
Best Budget
Firestone Winterforce 2 UV
Firestone Winterforce
3.0/5
3.0
Best High End
Pirelli Scorpion Zero All-Season
Pirelli Scorpion Zero All-Season
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT
BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport
3.5/5
3.5
Best Tread Life
Michelin Defender LTX
Michelin Defender LTX M/S
4.5/5
4.5

Updated as of December 2, 2022

General Grabber

General Grabber HTS 60
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
3/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

In the past, I’ve seen lots of success with General Grabbers mounted up on Chevrolet Suburbans and any other vehicle for that matter. For the Suburban specifically, I’ve recommended the Grabber HTS 60 because it’s an all-season tire that’s inexpensive and reliable.

Because of their awesome quality, it’s almost a joke to think that unreliable off-brand tires cost only slightly less than General Grabbers (who are an extremely reliable manufacturer).

Again, most Suburban owners do mostly road driving while dabbling in offroad adventure, so a durable all-season set is the perfect choice in this case.

One thing I love about General Grabber tires is that they have so many options when it comes to tire type. Here are some other submodels of General Grabber tires that could be a great match for your Suburban driving style:

One thing you’ll notice about General Grabbers is their longevity. If you maintain these well, they’ll last long time. Grabber HTS 60 tires I’ve recommended for your ‘burban’ are guaranteed for 6 years and 65 thousand miles, and I think that’s a solid deal for a big SUV that’s going to be tough on its tires.

I say pick your favorite General Grabbers option for your Suburban for the confident and also less expensive purchase.

Firestone Winterforce

Firestone Winterforce 2 UV
Our rating:
3.0/5
3.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
2.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Firestone Winterforce tires are unique directional treads designed for the cold highway with studdable screw-in points where you can install tire studs to drastically increase winter traction.

They also happen to be one of the most affordable choices for Chevy Suburban SUVs.

Despite their cool tread design, these tires perform very average in my opinion, and honestly they ride pretty much like all-season tires.

I’ve mounted these up on plenty of Suburbans, and the most important part of the process is recognizing that these are directional tires, so that means they’re passenger/driver-side specific, and they also must be installed and replaced in complete sets.

The crappy part about buying Firestone Winterforce tires is that there’s no treadwear warranty. Having said that, Tire Rack does offer 2-year free road hazard protection on these, so pick your poison I guess.

These tires are the perfect set to buy mounted and studded with a separate set of wheels, and switch to them for the winter months.

Don’t expect phenomenal snow traction out of these tires if you’re not going to add studs, and also don’t expect them to last as long as most other all-season tires.

For just over $150 per tire, Firestone Winteforce definitely aren’t a bad choice for your Suburban—but you could do better.

Pirelli Scorpion Zero All-Season

Pirelli Scorpion Zero All-Season
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.0/5

These are without a doubt the best tires for larger SUVs based on the fact that I’ve mounted up considerably more of these than any other tire in the luxury shop.

Because of their reliable performance, you’re going to be paying a large chunk of change for these.

But hands down, if you want the best highway performance, durable quality, responsive handling, and less all-around hassle, you should go with these—that’s why they’re some of the most-sold tires at higher end shops around the globe.

Just like the General Grabbers I listed above, Pirelli Scorpion has plenty of different submodels/tread types, so check out all of your options before buying.

For the snow, you’re going to either want a nice set of snow chains or buy Pirelli Winter. Overall, I like how the tread compound reacts with both extreme heat and extreme cold. The never get too hard in the cold, and they don’t commonly overheat when driven on the highway for long distances.

Use these if you hauled a boat, trailer, or any extra weight with my Suburban other than just the kids because their sidewalls are incredibly sturdy. You know the saying: “You get what you pay for!”.

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
2.5/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

These touring tires help enhance your Suburban handling and maneuverability, and the symmetrical all-season shape of these BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport makes them easy to rotate any which way to prevent uneven treadwear.

BFG uses an equal tension containment system to help every part of the tire make equal contact with the road for an enhanced footprint that you’ll notice has a unique design when compared to your traditional all-season tread pattern.

6-year/65 thousand mile warranty is what you can expect these tires to last for when properly maintained and driven on.

The shoulders of these tires are most definitely not ideal for kicking rocks away when offroading, so I’d go slower on gravel with these tires.

On the road, though, these tires are fun and safe when freshly mounted. I’d say you’re most-likely going to notice a big difference in highway driving quality when switching these out.

Michelin Defender LTX M/S

Michelin Defender LTX
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
5.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

The classic and effective design of Michelin Defender LTX tires with their multiple lateral grooves and trademarked Evertread compound are just two of the reasons why Michelin Defenders are a fantastic choice for your Chevy Suburban.

Seriously, after buying a set of Michelin tires it might feel like you never have to buy tires again. Find another set of light truck tires guaranteed for 70 thousand miles of treadwear—that’s going to be hard to do.

These tires are simply unbeatable on the market today because they provide an even mixture of traction in different types of road conditions, they maintain perfect control in rain and light snowy conditions, and the ride comfort that these provide (over bumps at higher speeds, for example) is impressive.

Again, you’re paying for quality, so if you’re running a fleet or doing rideshare, these tires are reliable for doing work. Defender LTX tires also hold up nicely when towing with your Suburban, and they’ll work just fine for light offroading and snow.

Keep your tire pressures set and these Michein Defenders still serve your Suburban well for a long time.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Chevy Suburban?

A few things to check before buying new Suburban tires:

All-season/All-terrain tires

I’ve noticed that most Suburbans thrive with all-season tires, but all-terrain sets like Yokohama Geolandar, Falken Wildpeak, and Toyo Open Country are all great options.

Only in rare cases do Suburbans ever have low-profile sport tires mounted up. Use mud terrain tires for consistent offroad use.

Road hazard coverage

Make sure your SUV tires are protected from nail punctures by verifying if your purchase comes with road hazard coverage or not.

Treadwear warranty

Treadwear warranties typically give you a good idea for roughly how long the tires could potentially last.

How Much Do Tires For Chevy Suburban Cost?

Good question, let’s take a look:

Four New Tires

Anywhere from $631-$1743.

Always replace all four tires when possible to prevent suspension damage and promote the best performance possible.

Two New Tires

~$315.5-$871.5

Single Tire

~$157.75-$435.75

What Tire Size Is Best For Chevy Suburban?

The 2023 Chevy Suburban has 18, 20, and 22-inch wheel diameters with these specific tire sizes:

  • 265/65-18
  • 275/50-22
  • 275/60-20

Enter your Suburban’s model year and trim package into Tire Rack’s website for the exact stock tire size results—these guys have measured each model and trim package with a portable coordinate measuring machine to ensure you get the right tires.

How Long Should Your Chevy Suburban Tires Last?

At least 50 thousand miles, but they might not. Don’t be frustrated if your tires don’t last more than 30k miles because the Suburban is a heavy beast notorious for shredding through tires.

Fill them with nitrogen for best results.

When To Replace Tires On Your Chevy Suburban?

Replacing the tires on your Chevy Suburban is necessary when one of the tread-depths hits 2/32” (1.6mm), and honestly most Suburban tires need to be replaced even before the recommended minimum safety recommendation.

You might notice that your old Suburban tires are chipped and peeling off from driving on dirt roads, or you might also notice uneven tire wear from slight alignment issues that weren’t resolved in time—this is all normal, and you should replace them when you feel comfortable.

Another good reason I’ve noticed to replace Chevy Suburban tires is if they have balancing issues and cause a lot of vibration.

Does The Brand Matter For A Chevy Suburban When Replacing Tires?

Sure it does, you wouldn’t want to buy a downhill bike from Jeep, and the same goes for tires, especially on a vehicle as beefy as the Suburban.

Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus, Nitto Grappler G2, Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure, Cooper Discoverer AT3 and Kumho Crugen HT51 are a few examples of other tires you might buy for your Suburban.

There are plenty of different Suburban trim packages from the past, including:

  • LTZ
  • LT
  • Z71
  • LS
  • High Country
  • Premier
  • etc.

Does the Year of Your Chevy Suburban Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes, tire sizes changed drastically over time starting with the 1936 Chevy Suburban’s white sidewalls up to the 2023 Suburban’s extremely large 22-inch wheel diameter on some models.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Suburban?

22-inch rims are currently the largest size stock tire, so 275/50-22 is technically the biggest size you can do without added suspension/modification.

Frequently Asked Questions
Having been in production since the mid 1930s, the Chevy Suburban is a solid vehicle. It doesn’t get good gas mileage, though.
Take it to the mechanic or scrap it.
I’d say it’s reliable power and worthiness for a good bashing.

Request a Tire review

Contribute to WeReviewTires.com by suggesting the next tire we review. Simply fill out the form below to add it to our que.