Top 5 Best Tires For Chevy Silverado 1500 [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols
By Tire Expert, Ryan Nichols

The 450+ lb. ft. of potential Chevy Silverado 1500 torque is enough reason to install tires that rock.

With a truck as nice as the Chevy Silverado, the last thing you want to do is sacrifice performance by mounting up a set of tires that will limit you. Naw, you need traction capability.

I’ve noticed that other tire reviews for the Chevrolet Silverado 1500 provide little to no useful information—other best tire reviews for the Silverado 1500 are salesy and looking to get your business.

I’m an American truck owner who knows what’s up when it comes to tires and tire accessibility. This ain’t my first rodeo shopping for new tires. Use my buying guide and experience to help you find the best tires for Chevy Silverado 1500 here:

Our Top Pick
Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
Yokohama Geolandar
4.5/5
4.5
Best Budget
Vredestein Pinza AT
Vredestein Pinza AT
4.5/5
4.5
Best High End
BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2
BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2
4.0/5
4.0
Most Economical
Falken WildPeak A/T3W Tire Review
Falken Wildpeak
4.0/5
4.0
Best Tread Life
Michelin Defender LTX
Michelin Defender LTX M/S
4.0/5
4.0

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Yokohama Geolandar

Yokohama Geolandar AT G015
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

From my experience installing and road-testing tires, I’d go with Yokohama Geolandars on a Chevy Silverado for a few reasons.

The main reason I’m a huge fan of Yokohama tires is because of the quality of their tread compound. Yokohama tires always have a consistent and reliable grip, they don’t deflate very easily, and they’re also easy to balance (unlike other beefy truck tires).

The price tag on Yokohama tires is also quite unintrusive to your wallet—they typically cost around a hundred bucks less than ‘higher-end’ truck tires while maintaining the off-road performance to rally hard (Travis Pastrana loves Yokohamas for rally car racing).

The best part about Yokohama Geolandar tires is that they come with multiple tread patterns for different styles of driving.

I’m a big fan of Geolandar A/T treads because of their versatility and 60k mileage warranty. They’re the perfect fit for light trucks.

I like how Yokohama includes a highway tire in their Geolandar modeling. Check ‘em out.

Check out how futuristically aggressive the Geolandar M/Ts stand compared to the competition. Geolandar M/Ts are made for heavy-duty off-road use.

I’d personally go with the Geolandar A/T tires for a Chevy Silverado 1500 because I don’t do much city driving in my pickup truck, and I also don’t take my truck into extreme offroading conditions like sand and mud.

Other comparable tires for the Chevy Silverado 1500 are Toyo Open Country and Falken Wildpeak.

Vredestein Pinza AT

Vredestein Pinza AT
Our rating:
4.5/5
4.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Tire Rack rants and raves about the Vredestein Pinza because they’re a newer tire brand in the USA that outmatches the competition in almost every way. And I gotta say, the white-lettered sidewalls on these are attractive.

Based out of Amsterdam, Vredestein makes it hard not to opt for the Pinza because they’re just about the cheapest option, but they also come with about the best warranty I’ve seen from a set of all-terrain tires—that’s a 70-thousand-mile treadwear warranty that lasts up to 8 years from the date of production.

From my experience, the Pinza AT tread design is a simple complexity that uses circumferential zig-zag treads on the outsides to effectively evacuate water when hydroplaning while maintaining the ability to grab hard on loose surfaces.

There are currently two different versions of Vredestein Pinza tires:

To clarify, the Vredestein ATs are what you want on your Silverado 1500 because of their well-balanced performance in any type of road condition.

From my experience, it’s completely obvious why these tires have such a great mileage warranty—because they’re new on the market—Vredestein wants customers to feel confident in their purchase, and that’s a good thing. That means these are an economical steal for the Chevy Silverado 1500.

Try Vredestein Pinza AT tires out for 100 days and send ‘em back.

BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2

BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.5/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

BFG has a long-standing reputation for having the best all-terrain tires on the market, and that’s one of the reasons why BFGoodrich tires cost the most, are the most durable, and typically perform better than the rest. 

Think Nike versus And 1 shoes—If your life is on the line, you’ll probably choose BFGoodrich over some other brand.

Yeah buddy, these are some of the most entertaining tires in fresh pow (not for ice) and they’re just slam dunkin’ it on gravel. They’re a little soft for the highway but overall just like any other piece of floating rubber.

I’d say buy these if you do an even amount of driving off the paved path. If all you do is drive on the road, probably not the best choice, but it’s not the end of the world.

For the Chevy Silverado 1500 BFG All-Terrains are a no-brainer for any type of road conditions. Despite the fact that your fuel efficiency will slightly suffer compared to all-season tires, the benefits greatly outweigh the risks.

Just keep an eye on that proper inflation and tread these tires like they’re expensive (cause they are). Fill your BFG All-Terrains with nitrogen for the best tire performance.

Goodyear Wrangler is another comparable tire—you gotta give it to the industry leaders for keeping up with each other.

Falken Wildpeak

Falken WildPeak A/T3W Tire Review
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
3.5/5
Dry Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

I’ve seen more Falken Wildpeak tires come through the shop than General Grabber HTS, for example, and maybe it’s because these tires make economic sense for the consumer.

So why are Falken Wildpeak such a reliable option for light truck road trips? It’s mainly because their capable offroad treads roll just as easily on the highway.

Falken Wildpeaks tread compound has a cut, chip, and tear-resistant design that makes them feel more comfortable compared to regular all-season tires, but they do have that all-season feel, and I personally think they are a bit better in wet conditions compared to other off-roading tires.

The downsides of Falken Wildpeaks that I’ll address are that these sometimes get pricy depending on which size you need, and they also make a bit more noise than an all-season tire when up to highway speeds.

When driving on Falken Wildpeak tires, I notice their puncture-resistant outer apex sidewall when bumping up against the rocks because it’s sturdier than a dedicated highway tire. Although all-terrain tires like these typically don’t perform well in wet road conditions, these have a shorter stopping distance than most because of their moisture-shedding full-depth sipes.

Click to read more about Falken Wildpeak tires.

Michelin Defender LTX M/S

Michelin Defender LTX
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

I choose Michelin Defenders for work trucks because they arguably last the longest, and you could bet on saving more in the long run with fuel economy and total mileage driven.

Their 6-year/70 thousand-mile warranty as well as their sturdy light truck performance are two of the reasons why Michelin Defender LTX M/S are some of the most-sold tires on the market.

As far as price range goes, these aren’t the cheapest, especially for all-season treads. Expect to pay over 200 bucks a tire at their current price. However, what smart consumers realize is that tires as good as Michelin Defenders end up saving time and money in the long run, especially for large fleet vehicles that run long routes with a heavy load.

Enhanced fuel economy, smooth ride quality, and consistent performance are three outstanding qualities of Michelin Defender LTX tires, and when compared to all-terrain tires which cost ~$300 per tire (~$100 more per tire).

Building contractors love mounting up Michelin Defenders to trucks like the Chevy Silverado 1500 because they’re more likely to show up at the job site in the morning. You might also be interested in Michelin LTX A/T 2—another recommendable tire option for the Silverado 1500.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For Chevy Silverado 1500?

Here’s what to look for when buying tires for your Silverado 1500:

Tire type specific to your driving style

You’ll either want all-season/touring tires, all-terrain (on-road/off-road) tires, or mud-terrain tires for your Silverado 1500. Ultra-high performance summer tires aren’t practical for this half-ton pickup truck.

Here are some advantages/disadvantages to each tire tread pattern:

All-season/Highway-terrain tires

All-season tires typically last the longest when driven on mostly paved surfaces, and they also have effective siping and circumferential grooves to maintain control when hydroplaning at faster speeds.

Other benefits of all-season tires are increased fuel economy for your Silverado 1500 and generally a quieter ride noise.

All-terrain tires

All-terrain tires provide offroad traction while maintaining the ability to cruise at faster speeds.

Mud-terrain tires

Mud terrain tires are for more strict offroading use, and you should never put too many road miles on mud-terrain models because for one, you’ll wear the treads down much quicker.

The second reason for not driving mud-terrain tires on the road is decreased fuel economy and road noise compared to both types of tires listed above.

Mileage warranty

All-season tires like Michelin Defender LTX typically have a longer mileage warranty, but most of these quality all-terrain tires recommended above are guaranteed for at least 50 thousand miles of treadwear.

Mail-in rebates & other deals

It’s never a bad idea to keep your eyes peeled for the best deal when buying truck tires.

Other maintenance repairs

Don’t go throwing a new set of tires onto your Silverado if the suspension/alignment needs work—bad bushings, shocks, springs, etc. cause abnormal tire wear and in some cases greatly reduce the life of your tires (costing you even more $$$).

For the best performance, I also always recommend inflating the tires with nitrogen instead of using the regular air compressor.

How Much Do Tires For Chevy Silverado 1500 Cost?

Between $200 and $400 USD is a reasonable estimate per tire for Chevy Silverado tires.

Four New Tires

Expect to pay somewhere between $800 and $1600 when buying a solid set of tires for your Chevy Silverado 1500.

Two New Tires

My estimate for two new Chevy Silverado 1500 tires is between $400 and $800.

Single Tire

Normally anywhere from $200-$400 per tire. Don’t forget that four-wheel-drive versions of the Chevy Silverado 1500 must have their tires replaced in pairs.

What Tire Size Is Best For A Chevy Silverado?

Since there are many different trim packages for the Chevy Silverado, there are a few different OEM Silverado 1500 tire sizes.

How Long Should Your Chevy Silverado Tires Last?

Try to get at least 50 thousand miles out of your Silverado tires if you want to save money.

I can never engrain it into my customers enough to keep their tires inflated to proper PSI (see the inside of your driver’s door panel), rotate tires from front to rear every 3-5 thousand miles, get an alignment service when necessary, etc. to help prolong the life of their tires.

When To Replace Tires On Your Chevy Silverado?

Measure your Silverado’s tires regularly with a tread depth measurement tool, and replace the tires when one of the treads reaches 2/32” (1.6 mm).

You might also when to replace your truck tires before the treads wear down if they have excessive chipping or chunks missing from the sidewall areas.

Repairing a nail hole/puncture close to the sidewall is always risky, so if you’re going to be daring, I recommend rotating more blowout-prone tires to the back of the truck to avoid losing control.

Does The Brand Matter For A Chevy Silverado 1500 When Replacing Tires?

Brand especially matters when selecting all-terrain tires for your Silverado because some have beefier treads than others. For example, you’ll notice that BFG All-terrains have a bit beefier shoulders than say Yokohama Geolandar A/Ts.

Each has its pros and cons—the big shoulders on the BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 set are a bit more aggressive scrambling up loose soil while the Geolandars feel a bit smoother at higher speeds.

Other tire brands for the Chevy Silverado include Firestone Destination, Bridgestone Blizzak, Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus, Kumho Road Venture, etc.

Does the Year of Your Chevy Silverado Matter When Buying New Tires?

Yes, different Silverado year and trim packages have different sets of rims and tire sizes. The easiest way to find the right tires for your Chevy Silverado 1500 is by plugging its information into Tire Rack’s website.

What Are The Biggest Tires I Can Put On A Chevy Silverado?

285/45R22 are the largest tires you’ll find on the Silverado 1500. The biggest tires specific to your Chevy Silverado you’ll see as a buying option when you plug the year and trim packages into sites like Tire Rack.

Frequently Asked Questions
I’d do the Yokohama Geolandars/Toyo Open Country for all-terrain tires and General tires or Michelin Defender LTX for all-season tires.
Chevy Silverado is among the most attractive and highest quality trucks on the planet.
Michelin Defender LTX M/S is my first choice, and then after that, I’d choose any all-season tire made by Continental or Pirelli.

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