Top 5 Best All-Terrain Tires [2022 Review]

By Tire Expert, Joe Steffen
By Tire Expert, Joe Steffen

Are you tired of scouring the internet trying to find an all-terrain for your crossover, SUV, or truck?

I know reading tons of reviews on tires that regurgitate tire jargon can be exhausting and makes you feel like you’re getting nowhere.

Well, that’s why I have compiled a list of the top five all-terrain tires on the market. Using my nine-plus years of experience in the tire industry, I have researched and hand-picked each of these tires to fit any needs you are looking for!

Keep scrolling to see why I chose each of these tires.

Honorable mentions: Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac W/Kevlar, Falken Wildpeak A/T3W, Nitto Terra Grappler G2, Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015, Toyo Open Country A/T III, Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus and the Michelin LTX A/T2

Our Top Pick
Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T
Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T
4.0/5
4.0
Best Budget
Atturo Trail Blade A/T
Atturo Trail Blade A/T
3.0/5
3.0
Best High End
BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2
BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2
3.5/5
3.5
Best For Daily Driving
Continental TerrainContact A/T
Continental TerrainContact A/T
4.0/5
4.0
Best For Highway Driving
Cooper Discoverer AT3 XLT/4S
Cooper Discoverer AT3 XLT/4S
3.5/5
3.5

Updated as of December 2, 2022

Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T

Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Comfort:
3.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

The Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T is hands down the most well-rounded off-road tire on the market.

It will come rated with a 3PMS(three-peak mountain snowflake), which means the rubber compound does not stiffen up at sub-forty-degree temperatures—allowing the tread blocks to stay flexible and pack snow in the siping and tread blocks.

I would dare to say it can compete with winter tires.

It has an asymmetrical tread design, providing optimal water and mud evacuation on those rainy days. Most all-terrain tires come with symmetrical tread designs to provide optimal even wear. However, I have yet to see a case where this Mickey Thompson comes in with a case of irregular wear, such as the dreaded tire cupping.

The off-road performance of this all-terrain is unmatched whether you’re flying down a dirt trail or crawling over rocks. It will give you confidence as the sidewall’s biting edges grip and rip through any surface.

The big reason I chose this tire as the number one option was its durability. The heavier cords in the angled third ply will make this tire feel like you could fire a bullet at the sidewall and be confident it won’t go through(do not try to shoot bullets through your tire).

On top of being resistant to sidewall punctures and blowouts, you will receive a fifty-thousand-mile warranty on the light truck sizes and a sixty-thousand-mile treadwear warranty on P-metric sizes.

This Mickey Thompson will be the next set of tires I put on our Ram 3500. After the first time I saw this tire, I was sold, the feedback from customers who have this tire was nothing short of amazing.

Usually, I will get one or two negative things about an all-terrain tire, but nothing from the Baja Boss A/T.

While the Mickey Thompson Baja Boss A/T will offer you best-in-class traction, durability, and handling, it will be expensive as it is a high-end all-terrain. But if you can afford them and they are available in your size, they will be worth every penny!

Atturo Trail Blade A/T

Atturo Trail Blade A/T
Our rating:
3.0/5
3.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Handling:
2.5/5
Dry Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Noise:
2.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
2.5/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Not everyone out there can shell out thousands of dollars for a new set of tires. That’s why I looked everywhere to find you a budget option that will offer safe traction and strong tread life.

At first, you might think, “what the heck is an Atturo.” Hear me out, while you may not be a fan of driving on some no-names, this Atturo tire will offer you qualities of name-brand tires like the Hankook Dynapro AT2. All while not breaking the bank.

While the Atturo Trail Blade A/T will give you safe wet, snow, and dry traction, it has drawbacks. Budget-friendly tires would not have the same ride quality as high-end tires because they wouldn’t be inexpensive if they did.

These Atturos have a drone when cruising down city streets and highways. This happens from the low-quality rubber compound paired with a tread design that does not use any form of harmonic tuning.

The other downside to this tread design is that it’s prone to cupping an irregular wear pattern that avid all-terrain users are familiar with. Cupping can make even the quietest tire into a rock concert in the car.

Loud ride aside, you will also notice they pick up any road vibrations, sending them directly to your seat and steering wheel.

While not many choose budget-friendly options because they are huge fans of them, I only picked this Atturo Trail Blade A/T because you will get safe all-season traction and a fifty-thousand-mile treadwear warranty.

The treadwear warranty is the only coverage offered on this tire, making it a low-value warranty.

For those looking for new tires with a financial restriction, they will provide you with everything necessary to keep you safe and last a reasonable amount of time.

BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2

BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.0/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
3.5/5
Value For Money:
3.0/5

The BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 is hands down one of the most well-known all terrains in the tire industry. This tire has a rich history of being dependable and durable. The KO2’s predecessor, the KO, was around for so long and well respected that I bet your Grandfather had a set of these on one of his old pickup trucks.

This tire was a no-brainer for the high-end option as it is one of the highest-priced tires out there and offers an exceptionally smooth ride. For a tire that has big old tread lugs arranged aggressively, it rides almost like a highway terrain tire.

BFGoodrich uses coregard technology in the tread compound, which makes the sidewalls twenty percent stronger than its predecessor. Having such a durable rubber compound makes it not only more puncture resistant but also lasts longer.

On top of having a fifty thousand-mile treadwear warranty, you also get a sixty-day satisfaction guarantee. If you don’t love them, take the tires back.

The KO2 would have been the number one overall pick three years ago, but unfortunately, this tire has been around for almost ten years.

Over that period, tire technology has changed so much that other tire manufacturers can construct tires that match or are even better than the KO2.

Another reason this tire didn’t make number one was the lackluster light snow traction, my buddy had them on a Toyota Tacoma, and we went camping up in the mountains while it was snowing. While we were out there, we decided to run some trails. Not even ten minutes in, he got stuck, and I had to pull him out.

For the price of the BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2, it is a great option, and it’s not a Baja champion tire for no reason. But I believe the Mickey Thompson edged it out when it came to snow traction and tread life.

Continental TerrainContact A/T

Continental TerrainContact A/T
Our rating:
4.0/5
4.0/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Handling:
4.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
4.0/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
4.0/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
3.5/5

Continental decided to get some skin in the all-terrain category a few years ago and has made this tire with one of the best daily driving all terrains out there. If you have a mid-sized pickup that is a pavement princess, this TerrainContact A/T is the one for you.

The TerrainContact A/T provides a quiet ride, and you won’t hear the excessive drone that typical all-terrains have. Traction Plus technology in the silica compound allows this tire to dissipate road noise before it gets to your cabin.

One important quality a tire needs when you do daily on-road driving is ride handling, and this tire excels when cornering and changing lanes all the time. When a tire doesn’t give you confidence behind the wheel, that’s a problem. With the TerrainContact, that’s not the case.

When Continental designed this tire it had those daily drivers in mind

This tire truly lacks off-road capability, as anyone who has tried to take this tire off the beaten path will tell you. It’s a good thing this was the daily driver category because otherwise, it wouldn’t have made it so high up.

How many miles you can receive out of this tire was another reason I chose it for the daily driver. I have seen it receive between fifty and seventy thousand miles which is awesome, especially if you commute far and need a tire that lasts.

What made this decision easy was the warranty that will come with this tire. You will get everything from a sixty-thousand-mile warranty, road hazard coverage, flat tire assistance, and a ride trial.

Continental backs this tire with the best warranty in the industry, which is huge for anyone driving on their tires every day.

Continental uses its other brand General Tire to make some serious off-road-ready tires like the famous red wall General Grabber X3, so don’t think Continental doesn’t know how to make some trail-capable tires.

I can confidently say that you are getting a high-quality tire with good value that will keep you safe and have a comfortable ride. As you can tell by the ratings, this tire has no downside for anyone looking at a purely street tire.

Cooper Discoverer AT3 XLT/4S

Cooper Discoverer AT3 XLT/4S
Our rating:
3.5/5
3.5/5

Pros and Cons

Ratings

Wet Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Handling:
3.0/5
Dry Traction:
4.0/5
Ride Noise:
3.5/5
Snow Traction:
3.5/5
Ride Comfort:
3.5/5
Tread Life:
4.0/5
Value For Money:
4.0/5

Nothing is worse than cruising down the highway and having to listen to your tires roar on the road. This Cooper is one of the toughest tires on the road, and getting these bad boys to sing is one challenging task.

Cooper makes some loud tires, especially mud-terrain tires, but with the AT3, you won’t have that annoying hum. But their quiet ride wasn’t the only reason I chose this tire for you highway flyers.

They offer some of the most extended tread life you can find in all terrains while providing more than safe traction in all weather conditions.

Are you taking this tire off-road or towing heavy loads?

No problem for this American-made tire, a lot of the time, you will notice decreased handling while towing heavy loads, but when hauling with the AT3 XLT, you won’t even notice the ten thousand pounds on the back of your truck. The XLT is the light truck tire option.

Coming with a three-peak mountain snowflake symbol on the sidewall means you can drive these puppies in any severe snow and feel confident you won’t slide out.

While the Discoverer AT3 isn’t a snow tire, I would feel confident driving on them in any snow storm. They use snow groove technology to help the tire pack snow in the tread and provide better traction when the snow has accumulated on the road.

The tread pattern is not as aggressive as you see when compared to tires like the Mickey Thompson or BFGoodrich, but that’s what allows them to resist hydroplaning situations.

Anyone looking for a tough AT tire providing on-road traction will not be disappointed with how well the Cooper Discoverer AT3 XLT/4S performs.

What To Look For When Buying The Best Tires For All-Terrain?

Here are a few things you want to look for when buying all-terrain tires:

Do they offer a three-peak mountain snowflake?

This is important to ensure they have a rubber compound that can withstand cold temperatures and provide you with safe snow traction.

Do they have a deep tread depth?

All terrains are more capable than all-season tires because their deep thick tread blocks allow more water, dirt, and snow to evacuate the tire quickly.

Is there siping in the tread blocks?

When you see an all-terrain with next to no siping in the tread blocks, this means it will not be efficient at evacuating water from the road and cause you to lose traction more likely.

How Much Do All-Terrain Tires Typically Cost?

I went ahead and compared prices from various tire retailers like SimpleTire, TireRack, Amazon, and Discount Tire. These are ballpark estimates from what I found:

Four New Tires

While it will heavily depend on your size and load index needed to fit the vehicle safely, I found that you can get a set of four all-terrain tires from anywhere between $500 and $2500.

Two New Tires

While it is always recommended to replace all four of your tires at the same time, you can get a pair of new all-terrain tires anywhere between $300 and $1400.

Single Tire

When only replacing a single tire you can find options between $150 and $300.

Are All-Terrain Tires Worth It?

I firmly believe all-terrain tires are worth it not only because they provide more traction capability than typical all-season tires but also because they can elevate the look of your vehicle. I put all terrains on all my cars; even my 2011 Cadillac CTS has a set of Falken Wildpeak AT trails on it.

How Long Should Your All-Terrain Tires Last?

While how many miles you receive out of any tire will heavily depend on well you can maintain your tire, i.e., rotating them every five to eight thousand miles. You can reasonably expect to get between thirty and sixty thousand miles out of your all terrains.

Does the Year of Your Vehicle Matter When Buying New All-Terrain Tires?

No! As long as the vehicle runs and they make all-terrain tires for your vehicle’s size and weight carrying capacity, you can put all terrains on any year vehicle.

Anything Else Worth Knowing When Buying All-Terrain Tires?

When buying all-terrain tires, you should remember that they are louder than typical all-season tire options. I can’t begin to tell you how often a customer would come in after buying all terrains and complain that they are loud. All-terrain tires have a much different standard of ride noise when compared to all-season tires.

Something else to note about all terrains is they are more prone to irregular wear, I can’t stress enough how important it will be to make sure you take care of all-terrain tires.

Frequently Asked Questions
AT stands for all-terrain, while MT stands for mud-terrain. The difference between these two tires is that while all-terrains are designed for light off-road and mud, a mud-terrain is designed for strictly off-road and mud situations. This does not mean mud terrains can’t ride on the road, and they’re just not as comfortable and safe in wet weather.
If the all-terrain tire has a three-peak mountain snowflake rating you can drive on them through all four season conditions.
While ride noise can be subjective, any tire designed to go off-road will inherently be louder than on-road tires due to their aggressive tread designs.

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